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seen Sep 13 '13 at 4:13

Sep
4
comment What is the relation between hash chaining and chosen prefix attack
@D.W. This post does suggest it prevents collisions: quora.com/Cryptography/… Chosen prefix collision attack: Even if one could find appendages appA and appB such that, md5(textA • appA) == md5(textB • appB) It would be very unlikely (or again, probably impossible) for the following to be true as well: md5(md5(textA • appA) • textA • appA) == md5(md5(textB • appB) • textB • appB)
Sep
2
comment What is the relation between hash chaining and chosen prefix attack
@D.W. Then why is it mentioned that chaining prevents collisions?
Aug
31
comment Why is the complexity of RSA-1024 80 bit and not 86 bit?
Does a strength of 80 bit mean you need to bruteforce through 2^80 possibilities?
Aug
31
comment Why is the complexity of RSA-1024 80 bit and not 86 bit?
Does a strength of 80 bit mean you need to bruteforce through 2^80 possibilities?
Aug
31
comment Why is the complexity of RSA-1024 80 bit and not 86 bit?
@poncho Did you just claim that a "2048" bit RSA key does not have a 2048 bit Modulus? And you really NEED a 1024 bit public component for a "2048" bit RSA key? I guess '65537' is not 1024 bit.
Aug
30
comment Why is the complexity of RSA-1024 80 bit and not 86 bit?
Could I be mistaken that the modulus size is twice the length of the key sizes?
Aug
30
comment Why is the complexity of RSA-1024 80 bit and not 86 bit?
@poncho Don't try to confuse people with that statement, please.
Aug
30
comment Security strength of RSA in relation with the modulus size
"The value of k is commonly considered to be the key size." See page 64 of NIST SP 800-57
Aug
30
comment Security strength of RSA in relation with the modulus size
Could you explain why the strength is 80 and not 86 for RSA-1024?
Aug
30
comment If we can find prime numbers larger than 17 milion digits, why can't we find all 1024bit primes?
But strength of RSA-1024 is just 2^80 (80 bits) and not 2^1013.5
Aug
30
comment If we can find prime numbers larger than 17 milion digits, why can't we find all 1024bit primes?
I guess General Number Field Sieve is efficient in this. It probably skips a lot of primes. || I also don't see why you mutliply with (2^1024-1) and divide by 2.
Jul
24
comment Explain the 'Breaking 104 bit WEP in less than 60 seconds' paper
'many years' <-- they cracked it in less than 60 seconds... How would it even make sense to talk about 'how many years'....
Jul
24
comment Explain the 'Breaking 104 bit WEP in less than 60 seconds' paper
@AbhiBeckert Well, how would you explain the significance of 1.24/256 vs 1/256 when skipping the general public part?
Jul
22
comment How was 256-bit WEP cracked as well?
@nightcracker: Could you explain it with the probability distributions mentioned by the authors: 'Andreas Klein showed that there is a correlation in RC4 between Keybytes 1 to i-1, the keystream and the keybyte i. If the keybytes 1 to i-1 and the keystream are known, it is possible to guess the next unknown keybyte with a probability of about 1.36/256'
Jul
22
comment How was 256-bit WEP cracked as well?
Wikipedia states that 'leaving 232 bits for actual protection'. So, you are saying that you don't need to crack the 232 bits? Then how many (bits) of the 232 bits do you need to crack?
Jul
22
comment How was 256-bit WEP cracked as well?
No, I am not using WEP. Just trying to understand why 256-bit encryption is not strong enough. While 256-bit keys are considered secure, when talking about AES for example. What are the names of this attack?
Jul
22
comment AES: keylength and password length?
How about skipping the key derivation function, if the password length and keylength match?
Jul
2
comment Are there Cryptography certifications variants of CISSP?
CISSP does not really cover the mathematical part of crypto.
Jun
24
comment If we can find prime numbers larger than 17 milion digits, why can't we find all 1024bit primes?
*subatomic particle... It turns out that roughly 68% of the Universe is dark energy. Dark matter makes up about 27%. The rest - everything on Earth, everything ever observed with all of our instruments, all normal matter - adds up to less than 5% of the Universe. '
Jun
24
comment If we can find prime numbers larger than 17 milion digits, why can't we find all 1024bit primes?
How about subatomic particles from CERN? And dark matter?' It turns out that roughly 68% of the Universe is dark energy. Dark matter makes up about 27%. The rest - everything on Earth, everything ever observed with all of our instruments, all normal matter - adds up to less than 5% of the Universe. '