459 reputation
35
bio website explorations.chasrmartin.com
location United States
age 58
visits member for 3 years
seen Jan 8 at 20:16

God I've been doing this a long time -- since 1969. And the temptation to answer some teenage hacker with "you'll understand when you grow up" gets stronger and stronger.

In the mean time, stay the hell offa my lawn.


Aug
3
comment How can SSL secure a two-way communication with only one key-pair?
"using something like" might have given a clue I was talking about a model one, not the only possible one.
Jul
21
comment How can SSL secure a two-way communication with only one key-pair?
@Jus12 but do realize that Wikipedia is a pretty good source for this sort of technical topic.
Jul
15
comment What are the practical difference between 256-bit, 192-bit, and 128-bit AES encryption?
@samoz I haven't read the full paper yet, but notice that there are several special conditions on that: fewer rounds than standard, and related keys. Real-world use uses the same number of rounds as the standard and uses unrelated keys from an entropy source. But you're right that there are known attacks on AES variants under special conditions that are less computationally intense.
Jul
15
comment Is it possible to derive the encryption method from encrypted text?
One interesting consequence of this -- that an encrypted data stream should be apparently random -- is that it explains why you should compress, then encrypt, rather than encrypting then compressing. Compression depends on redundancy, and an encrypted stream has none. In fact, a compressed encrypted file may turn out to be larger than the original.
Jul
13
comment How can SSL secure a two-way communication with only one key-pair?
@Soumya92, no it doesn't, re-read the description and follow the link to en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… and note that TLS isn't actually identical to SSL. But the original SSL handshake is like having an empty PreMasterSecret.
Jul
13
comment With sufficient randomness, is XOR an acceptable mechanism for encrypting?
@Paulo you're right that could be carried out a little further, say by having a rul that blocks the PIN after 3 unsuccessful tries. The important point, though, is still to identify risk as the driver.
Jul
13
comment With sufficient randomness, is XOR an acceptable mechanism for encrypting?
RIght, that's utility weighted. Since everyone has a different utility function, that's not very useful.
Jul
13
comment What are the practical difference between 256-bit, 192-bit, and 128-bit AES encryption?
Depends on how long you're willing to wait for Armageddon. Seriously, if something is too sensitive for 256 bits, you should worry more about someone proving P=NP, 'cause then all bets are off.