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bio website edutoolbox.de
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visits member for 1 year, 3 months
seen 2 days ago

entrepreneur, software developer (python, javascript, go, cpp), veterinary doctor, ngo/pol activist


Nov
18
awarded  Tumbleweed
Nov
11
awarded  Custodian
Nov
11
awarded  Editor
Nov
11
reviewed Edit Test framework for hash functions for collision resistance?
Nov
11
revised Test framework for hash functions for collision resistance?
Corrected spelling
Nov
11
asked Test framework for hash functions for collision resistance?
Nov
8
comment Interpretation of the results of NIST (p)NRG suite
The PRNG the NIST-Question referred to is public now: github.com/AndreasBriese/breeze You are a well known cryptographer - maybe you have a look, please.
Oct
28
awarded  Scholar
Oct
24
comment Advantages of combined PRNGs
Your first comment cited 'a large byte stream that has near equal frequencies for each byte is NOT what random behaves like'. Now you are talking about distribution assessment in small streams (i.e. from hash algorithms). Anyway, PRNGs should deliver equally distributed bits/bytes assessable on the long run. And even (cryptographic save) hash one way functions do so if using them to produce larger sequences as can be shown by analyzing iterative produced bitstreams (hash(hash(hash(..))).
Oct
23
answered How do you test randomness?
Oct
23
comment Advantages of combined PRNGs
@RichieFrame Reading bits to bytes from a (PRNG) random bitstream produces random bytes that are (near) equally distributed (see also: NIST statistic package csrc.nist.gov/groups/ST/toolkit/rng/documentation_software.html).
Oct
23
answered Advantages of combined PRNGs
Oct
23
accepted Interpretation of the results of NIST (p)NRG suite
Oct
23
comment Interpretation of the results of NIST (p)NRG suite
Thaks a lot. Anyway i wonder about the p-value column. Generally smaller p-values in the table should be better (as usually in statistics)? And shouldn't been have any test rejected that exposes p>0.01?
Oct
23
asked Interpretation of the results of NIST (p)NRG suite
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Sep
14
comment Why does openssl BN_generate_prime return only a fraction of the safe primes within the given bit range?
@DW: i had a slightly different hypothesis (from dreaming tonight ;-): maybe openSSL does prime-generaton within 2^31<p<0.5*2^32 and then tests 2p+1 for primality. That would fit the resulted safe prime range and it would be consistent with your explanation of the coupon collectors problem (thanks for this in particular). And yes, there is a somehow strange distribution of the frequency of being chosen (chosen safe prime histogram remembers a 1/x graph). (By the way: i looked into openssl source but nearly lost my confidence)
Sep
14
awarded  Student
Sep
13
asked Why does openssl BN_generate_prime return only a fraction of the safe primes within the given bit range?