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 Yearling
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Feb
28
revised What would a backdoor in symmetric key cipher look like?
added 20 characters in body
Feb
27
comment What would a backdoor in symmetric key cipher look like?
Yes, the cipher derived from the RSA algorithm would be a stream cipher. (Not sure if that was your question.)
Feb
27
revised What would a backdoor in symmetric key cipher look like?
added 8 characters in body
Feb
27
answered What would a backdoor in symmetric key cipher look like?
Oct
17
awarded  Yearling
Sep
10
comment How can I map arbitrary group elements to unique integers without using Hash functions?
So, verification of a signature should just consist in trying all public keys, correct?
Sep
10
comment How can I map arbitrary group elements to unique integers without using Hash functions?
I'm not particularly knowledgeable about ring signatures, but couldn't you just release all public keys without disclosing which belongs to whom?
Sep
10
comment How can I map arbitrary group elements to unique integers without using Hash functions?
Sorry, but I remain confused. 1. Why are you keeping the public key secret? 2. What does the third party know? What exactly is it supposed to be able to verify?
Sep
9
comment How can I map arbitrary group elements to unique integers without using Hash functions?
Note that finding $\varphi^{-1}$ might be infeasible in some cases. It would help to know which group you're trying to map to $\mathbb Z_p$.
Sep
9
answered How can I map arbitrary group elements to unique integers without using Hash functions?
Mar
5
awarded  Disciplined
Feb
24
comment Difference between Rijndael 128 / 256 blocksize implementations? (and impact of block size in general)
@figlesquidge: Uppercase B means bytes, not bits.
Jan
5
comment Deterministically combine more than one source of entropy
I'm not sure I know what you mean. Are you talking about deriving an integer from a pseudo-randomly generated floating point number or about the uniform distribution of the exclusive OR?
Jan
5
answered Deterministically combine more than one source of entropy
Jan
5
comment Deterministically combine more than one source of entropy
The sum of r1 and r2 will have an Irwin–Hall distribution, which is not at all uniform.
Dec
30
comment Why xor is a linear operation but ordinary adding is not
γ1 and γ2 can be any scalar, i.e, any element of the field F. In the example of the 8-bit integers, the only scalars are 0 and 1, yes. But in general, F could be any field, e.g., the set of all rational, real or complex numbers.
Dec
30
revised Why xor is a linear operation but ordinary adding is not
added 7 characters in body
Dec
28
revised Why xor is a linear operation but ordinary adding is not
deleted 171 characters in body
Dec
28
comment Why xor is a linear operation but ordinary adding is not
Right, scalar multiplication isn't distributive over field addition.
Dec
28
answered Why xor is a linear operation but ordinary adding is not