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CodesInChaos
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Here is an excellent paper on the math of asymmetric key encryption: http://www.mathaware.org/mam/06/Kaliski.pdf‎

See the example on Page 6.

The public key = 55$55$ Primes used to calculate public key are 5$5$ and 11$11$. e = 3

$e = 3$

Now see the appendix: L = LCM (p-1, q-1) = 20$L = \mathrm{LCM}(p-1, q-1) = 20$

The paper states de = 1 mod L$de = 1 \mod L$

I can't figure out how he gets the value of d = 7$d = 7$

Here is an excellent paper on the math of asymmetric key encryption: http://www.mathaware.org/mam/06/Kaliski.pdf‎

See the example on Page 6.

The public key = 55 Primes used to calculate public key are 5 and 11. e = 3

Now see the appendix: L = LCM (p-1, q-1) = 20

The paper states de = 1 mod L

I can't figure out how he gets the value of d = 7

Here is an excellent paper on the math of asymmetric key encryption: http://www.mathaware.org/mam/06/Kaliski.pdf‎

See the example on Page 6.

The public key = $55$ Primes used to calculate public key are $5$ and $11$.

$e = 3$

Now see the appendix: $L = \mathrm{LCM}(p-1, q-1) = 20$

The paper states $de = 1 \mod L$

I can't figure out how he gets the value of $d = 7$

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how do you calculate the private exponent in asymmetric key encryption

Here is an excellent paper on the math of asymmetric key encryption: http://www.mathaware.org/mam/06/Kaliski.pdf‎

See the example on Page 6.

The public key = 55 Primes used to calculate public key are 5 and 11. e = 3

Now see the appendix: L = LCM (p-1, q-1) = 20

The paper states de = 1 mod L

I can't figure out how he gets the value of d = 7