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As we know that in DH key exchange, both Alice and Bob would agree on the parameter $p$ and $g$. Next, Alice would choose a secret key $A$ while Bob would choose a secret key $B$. Alice would compute $g^A\mod p$ and Bob would compute $g^B\mod p$. They would exchange these computed values and each side would raise their secret key against the received computed value, i.e. $(g^A)^B\mod p = (g^B)^A\mod p$.

From Charlie's (external party) point of view, he would know values of $p$, $g$, $g^A\mod p$ and $g^B\mod p$. Assuming that $g^A\mod p$ and $g^B\mod p$ are 100 digits long, would he be able to determine a bound (in terms of digits or bits) for the respective secret key $A$ and $B$?

Please do point me at any links that is relevant to this question! Thanks & Cheers!

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  • $\begingroup$ Would appreciate your comments on this question when you downvote, so that I could improve on it. Thanks! $\endgroup$ – edmund2008 Apr 29 '14 at 9:30
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Assuming that $g^A \bmod p$ and $g^B \bmod p$ are 100 digits long, would Charlie be able to determine a bound (in terms of digits or bits) for the respective secret key $A$ and $B$ ?

100 digits is approximately 332 bits; if $p$ is 332 bits long, then it is known to be feasible to apply the Number Field Sieve algorithm to recover the values $A$ and/or $B$; that certainly would give him the bound.

For reference, Antoine Joux and Reynald Lercier computed the discrete log of a 431 bit (130 digit) base in three weeks.

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