3
$\begingroup$

Just like we have AES in crypotography, which is the most secure technique in Steganography? I am looking for a technique in which the standard image characteristic modifications it does go undetected(as yet). This question is regarding image steganography and I want to store few bytes of information.

$\endgroup$
4
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ "Most secure" is not very well defined, and I wouldn't say AES is "most secure" either, just good enough and standard. $\endgroup$
    – otus
    Jul 6, 2015 at 11:10
  • $\begingroup$ Read the last line of my post: "I am looking for a technique in which the standard image characteristic modifications it does go undetected(as yet)." $\endgroup$
    – Jay
    Jul 6, 2015 at 11:11
  • $\begingroup$ Voting to close as too broad for the following reasons (a) You start asking about steganography techniques in general, then refer to images in particular. Which is it? (b) Even if you restrict the scope of your question to images, you haven't stated what sort of images are acceptable (JPEG, PNG, hard copies), or how much information you want to store in them (A few bytes? Several kilobytes? More?). (c) The most secure steganography technique is (almost by definition) one that nobody has ever heard of, so it's impossible to provide a good answer to this question. $\endgroup$
    – r3mainer
    Jul 6, 2015 at 13:40
  • $\begingroup$ I have editied the question. Please revoke the "on hold" status. I have got the answer to my question. $\endgroup$
    – Jay
    Jul 7, 2015 at 3:16

1 Answer 1

5
$\begingroup$

Steganography is in general impossible, and most "practical" schemes do not work. If you are really interested in the area, however, there was some work done about a decade ago on provably secure steganography. It relies on an understanding of the distribution of the messages, which is what makes it very problematic in practice.

Here are a couple of works to get you started: https://www.cs.cmu.edu/~biglou/PSS.pdf and http://cs.brown.edu/~anna/papers/lysmey06.pdf.

I stress, however, once again: practical steganography schemes are broken. They can typically be easily distinguished using basic machine learning tools.

$\endgroup$
2
  • $\begingroup$ What if the practical schemes themselves were built using machine learning? There are people on github using deep learning for hiding images inside other images, most steganalysis tools available on the market cannot detect them. Search for "deep learning steganography" gives back quite a few repos. $\endgroup$
    – Ruan
    Aug 8, 2018 at 17:50
  • $\begingroup$ 'I stress, however, once again: practical steganography schemes are broken. They can typically be easily distinguished using basic machine learning tools.' - What proof do you have for that assertion?. Sure, if you have the original and the modified image you can show a difference. A byte-compare of the file would do that. But if you do not have the original then there are schemes that will be extremely difficult to detect. In fact some schemes coding the data into the dc coefficients of a jpeg may prove impossible to detect. $\endgroup$
    – DrPhill
    Jan 9, 2019 at 11:57

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.