1
$\begingroup$

SSL (Secure Socket Layer). windows Webbroswers ( Chrome, Mozilla, Edge, explorer ) are using which winapi set to Encrypt and Decrypt Data. SSL is asymmetric encryption. So which Api set is being used to decrypt receavied chipher.

$\endgroup$
2
  • 4
    $\begingroup$ I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because questions about programming, libraries and platform specific APIs may be asked on stackoverflow.com $\endgroup$ – Henrick Hellström Oct 21 '15 at 6:35
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ Internet Explorer uses SChannel (part of windows). Mozilla uses NSS API (their own TLS implementation). Chrome uses a derivative of OpenSSL. $\endgroup$ – CodesInChaos Oct 21 '15 at 7:17
2
$\begingroup$

SSL/TLS is a secure protocol that encorporates the negotiation of cryptographic parameters for asymmetric and symmetric algorithms, integrity algorithms, and verification algorithms. You can read more about this on How does TLS work? You can find more information on the cipher suites used for negotiations in this answer. The same API used for SSL/TLS is generally used for symmetric decryption/encryption.


Mozilla both use versions of the open source (MPL) NSS library for their SSL implementations. Since it's open source there are differences between the two, but the guts should be the same.

Chrome used to use a version of NSS, and originally stated that they would switch to OpenSSL. However, in the wake of various implementation vulnerabilities Google has decided to make their own clean version of OpenSSL called BoringSSL.

Internet Explorer is tied directly into Windows SChannel (Secure Channel) which is run and handled by Windows' LSASS process. It would surprise me if Windows Edge didn't use this as well. It uses WinHTTP, and is only available (for now) on Microsoft Windows platforms.

$\endgroup$
2
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ I think your information on Chrome is outdated. I believe they're using OpenSSL at the moment and are switching to BoringSSL. $\endgroup$ – CodesInChaos Oct 21 '15 at 12:00
  • $\begingroup$ @CodesInChaos You're absolutely right. And apparently BoringSSL is their own fork of OpenSSL. Thanks for the catch! $\endgroup$ – RoraΖ Oct 21 '15 at 12:05

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.