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I am new to cryptography and was wondering if it would be possible to semi-reliably "decrypt" an encrypted message by using the statistical distribution of symbols (/letters/numbers) in the encrypted message in accordance with Zipf distribution.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zipf%27s_law?

If "symbols" were "recycled" (for example, if x = 102023 , then a = 102023 later) then this would not be possible, right? If "symbols" are not "recycled", is the code very weak?

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No, it is not possible to semi-reliably "decrypt" an encrypted message by using the statistical distribution of symbols, if some modern encryption scheme is used, and its secret/private key does not leak. Modern encryption is practically immune to known distribution or other characteristic in the plaintext.

The goal of modern encryption, that it reaches in practice, is that given the ciphertext, but lacking the key (or the private key for public-key encryption), the only thing that can be determined about the plaintext is its length (and then perhaps, only the order of magnitude of that).

Modern encryption does not create a one-one match between symbols in plaintext and ciphertext (as is the case for monoalphabetic substitution, or Electronic CodeBook); that indeed would be a weakness.

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