0
$\begingroup$

Can one calc the 16 subkeys in DES in one step ? I mean that we create for example a new “box“ where we directly permute the key k in 16 subkeys

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ Sounds like instead recirculating C and D registers each round according to the key schedule you'd be talking about 16 unique variants of Permuted Choice 2. In what context 'in one step'? In hardware this would just be wires. $\endgroup$ – user1430 Dec 4 '16 at 9:18
  • $\begingroup$ So that i just have the box, and dont have to calculate k1,...,k16. I just want to look in the box. This should be working, but how can i build this box ? Can you Calculate the first entry for example ? $\endgroup$ – userkir Dec 4 '16 at 9:50
1
$\begingroup$

Your accepted answer is the first round key from in terms of input block bits. The rest are:

  Bit  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24
KS
   1  10 51 34 60 49 17 33 57  2  9 19 42  3 35 26 25 44 58 59  1 36 27 18 41
   2   2 43 26 52 41  9 25 49 59  1 11 34 60 27 18 17 36 50 51 58 57 19 10 33
   3  51 27 10 36 25 58  9 33 43 50 60 18 44 11  2  1 49 34 35 42 41  3 59 17
   4  35 11 59 49  9 42 58 17 27 34 44  2 57 60 51 50 33 18 19 26 25 52 43  1
   5  19 60 43 33 58 26 42  1 11 18 57 51 41 44 35 34 17  2  3 10  9 36 27 50
   6   3 44 27 17 42 10 26 50 60  2 41 35 25 57 19 18  1 51 52 59 58 49 11 34
   7  52 57 11  1 26 59 10 34 44 51 25 19  9 41  3  2 50 35 36 43 42 33 60 18
   8  36 41 60 50 10 43 59 18 57 35  9  3 58 25 52 51 34 19 49 27 26 17 44  2
   9  57 33 52 42  2 35 51 10 49 27  1 60 50 17 44 43 26 11 41 19 18  9 36 59
  10  41 17 36 26 51 19 35 59 33 11 50 44 34  1 57 27 10 60 25  3  2 58 49 43
  11  25  1 49 10 35  3 19 43 17 60 34 57 18 50 41 11 59 44  9 52 51 42 33 27
  12   9 50 33 59 19 52  3 27  1 44 18 41  2 34 25 60 43 57 58 36 35 26 17 11
  13  58 34 17 43  3 36 52 11 50 57  2 25 51 18  9 44 27 41 42 49 19 10  1 60
  14  42 18  1 27 52 49 36 60 34 41 51  9 35  2 58 57 11 25 26 33  3 59 50 44
  15  26  2 50 11 36 33 49 44 18 25 35 58 19 51 42 41 60  9 10 17 52 43 34 57
  16  18 59 42  3 57 25 41 36 10 17 27 50 11 43 34 33 52  1  2  9 44 35 26 49

  Bit 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48
KS
   1  22 28 39 54 37  4 47 30  5 53 23 29 61 21 38 63 15 20 45 14 13 62 55 31
   2  14 20 31 46 29 63 39 22 28 45 15 21 53 13 30 55  7 12 37  6  5 54 47 23
   3  61  4 15 30 13 47 23  6 12 29 62  5 37 28 14 39 54 63 21 53 20 38 31  7
   4  45 55 62 14 28 31  7 53 63 13 46 20 21 12 61 23 38 47  5 37  4 22 15 54
   5  29 39 46 61 12 15 54 37 47 28 30  4  5 63 45  7 22 31 20 21 55  6 62 38
   6  13 23 30 45 63 62 38 21 31 12 14 55 20 47 29 54  6 15  4  5 39 53 46 22
   7  28  7 14 29 47 46 22  5 15 63 61 39  4 31 13 38 53 62 55 20 23 37 30  6
   8  12 54 61 13 31 30  6 20 62 47 45 23 55 15 28 22 37 46 39  4  7 21 14 53
   9   4 46 53  5 23 22 61 12 54 39 37 15 47  7 20 14 29 38 31 63 62 13  6 45
  10  55 30 37 20  7  6 45 63 38 23 21 62 31 54  4 61 13 22 15 47 46 28 53 29
  11  39 14 21  4 54 53 29 47 22  7  5 46 15 38 55 45 28  6 62 31 30 12 37 13
  12  23 61  5 55 38 37 13 31  6 54 20 30 62 22 39 29 12 53 46 15 14 63 21 28
  13   7 45 20 39 22 21 28 15 53 38  4 14 46  6 23 13 63 37 30 62 61 47  5 12
  14  54 29  4 23  6  5 12 62 37 22 55 61 30 53  7 28 47 21 14 46 45 31 20 63
  15  38 13 55  7 53 20 63 46 21  6 39 45 14 37 54 12 31  5 61 30 29 15  4 47
  16  30  5 47 62 45 12 55 38 13 61 31 37  6 29 46  4 23 28 53 22 21  7 63 39

The 80 column format in separate round keys represent C and D register values is generated via the C program keytab.c with a command line option -b (e.g. keytab -b).

The program is derived from the original BSD libcrypt library which could be used for DES encryption and decryption by loading a null salt.

It would lend itself to generating the source code for producing the source code in the language of your choice by referencing elements of the key as they are denoted in your design.

The libcrypt source has also been used to code generate portions of DES implemented in VHDL.

$\endgroup$
1
$\begingroup$

Yes one can, this is, for example, in Stinson's book "Cryptography and Security", 1st edition, from which I quote.

We now display the resulting key schedule. As mentioned above, each round uses a 48-bit key comprised of 48 of the bits in K. The entries in the tables below refer to the bits in K that are used in the various rounds.

Round 1

10 51 34 60 49 17 33 57 2 9 19 42 3 35 26 25 44 58 59 1 36 27 18 41 22 28 39 54 37 4 47 30 5 53 23 29 61 21 38 63 15 20 45 14 13 62 55 31

Thus the round 1 subkey uses bits 10,51,...,31 in that order.

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.