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Private information retrieval (PIR) protocols assume multiple parties have copies of a search database. How practical is this in real world? (In more details the 'practical' term is: Will Google be ready to allow other independent search tools copy its database for such PIR? If Google allows, then I assume that there should be no loss in its business)

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  • $\begingroup$ Do you have any specific PIR protocols in mind? I was under the impression that there are PIR protocols that do not require multiple parties to have copies. $\endgroup$ – mikeazo Jan 4 '17 at 16:07
  • $\begingroup$ With respect to the comment "Do you have any specific PIR protocols in mind? I was under the impression that there are PIR protocols that do not require multiple parties to have copies." by mikeazo, I am adding my comments. I was attending the lecture "CERIAS - 2016-03-09 - Batch Techniques for Practical Private Information Retrieval" by Ryan Henry in Youtube. The lecture uses Goldberg's PIR (I assume). $\endgroup$ – learner1 Jan 4 '17 at 16:21
  • $\begingroup$ You appear to have created two accounts, see this for how to merge them. $\endgroup$ – mikeazo Jan 4 '17 at 16:30
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Information theoretic PIR protocols that have communication complexity less than the size of the database require multiple, non-cooperating servers [1]. In a computational setting, this is not required. So if you do not want to have to share your database with multiple servers, you should probably use a computational PIR protocol.

1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Private_information_retrieval#Advances_in_information_theoretic_PIR

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