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Reference to SSL 2.0 specs. from: Mozilla - SSL 2.0 Can I conclude that SSL 2.0 Finish messages does not provide AMC for all the messages sent/received by both parties (as in TLS 1.2)? Due to lack of SSL 2.0 official detailed documentation, I am unable to confirm this.

2.2.1 Assuming no session-identifier

client-hello         C -> S: challenge, cipher_specs
server-hello         S -> C: connection-id,server_certificate,cipher_specs
client-master-key    C -> S: {master_key}server_public_key
client-finish        C -> S: {connection-id}client_write_key
server-verify        S -> C: {challenge}server_write_key
server-finish        S -> C: {new_session_id}server_write_key
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  • $\begingroup$ Wait, the link actually says 0.2. That was never even released. What are you doing? $\endgroup$ – Elias Jan 30 '17 at 16:38
  • $\begingroup$ @Elias Title aside, that is the correct documentation for SSLv2. $\endgroup$ – Xander Jan 30 '17 at 17:25
  • $\begingroup$ @Xander You mean typing mistake in the title? How did you know that? $\endgroup$ – user2192774 Jan 30 '17 at 17:48
  • $\begingroup$ What do you mean by "AMC"? $\endgroup$ – SEJPM Jan 30 '17 at 18:12
  • $\begingroup$ @user2192774 It isn't a typing mistake. It's an artifact of a change in how version numbers are interpreted between the SSL2 and SSL3 specs. SSL2 reads the version as "2" and SSL3 reads it as "0.2" so the version numbers (0.2 and v2) are to some degree considered interchangable. $\endgroup$ – Xander Jan 30 '17 at 19:25
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Yes, SSL2 did not MAC the handshake. See (recentish and more available) rfc6176

  1. SSL 2.0 Deficiencies

    SSL version 2.0 [SSL2] deficiencies include the following:

    ...

    o Handshake messages are not protected. This permits a man-in-the- middle to trick the client into picking a weaker cipher suite than it would normally choose.

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