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I am a final-year student in the Department of Computer Science. I do my bachelor thesis in cryptography and the subject is multilinear maps. There exists a good book describing the concepts? Or maybe other theses..

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closed as off-topic by Maarten Bodewes, fkraiem, e-sushi Feb 21 '17 at 2:41

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    $\begingroup$ Are you referring to bilinear maps/pairings, or do you mean multilinear maps like those based on lattices? As far as I know, currently all multilinear maps (excluding bilinear maps) are broken, or faith in existing multilinear maps is so low that people have not even attempted to break them anymore. $\endgroup$ – TMM Feb 20 '17 at 22:21
  • $\begingroup$ Yes TMM, those based on lattices and on integers. I know, but I ask for the literature needed for understanding the actual work made on multilinear maps (not interested in bilinear maps). $\endgroup$ – penguina Feb 20 '17 at 23:01
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    $\begingroup$ Multilinear maps were really hot a few years ago, with lots of papers appearing at major conferences. Then they were broken, fixed, broken, fixed, broken, and like I said I think most of the community has lost track and lost faith in these constructions for now. So you won't find any books on the topic (it's too fresh and too unclear), and I think your best bet is just to scan the Cryptology ePrint Archive for multilinear maps papers. I'm not aware of specific theses on the topic - you might try googling the authors of the multilinear maps papers. $\endgroup$ – TMM Feb 20 '17 at 23:28
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    $\begingroup$ Just one more comment: on the breaking-side, I think the biggest contribution was the "zeroizing" attack originally proposed by Cheon et al in 2015 or so. I think most breaks of later multilinear maps proposals were based on some variant of these zeroizing attacks. $\endgroup$ – TMM Feb 20 '17 at 23:30
  • $\begingroup$ @e-sushi God, these policies are ridiculous. If you don't want to help people who are looking to do cryptography research, don't join a StackExchange website! And if you do, stop complaining about technicalities and spend your time helping these people instead of blocking everyone who needs help. (And I don't care anymore if you remove my comments for not being according to the rules - if you do though, that's further validation that I should not be sharing my expertise with this toxic, arrogant community.) $\endgroup$ – TMM Feb 21 '17 at 9:56