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Here we can see the suggested key-length by NIST in a few decades: https://www.keylength.com/en/4/#Biblio10

Does this consider quantum-computer?

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  • $\begingroup$ Note the citation for NIST keylengths is not [10] but [4] which is Special Pub 800-57 part 1 which you can easily download in PDF and control-F in Reader takes about a second to find it is 'as of the publication of this Recommendation ... quantum computing may affect these equivalencies in the future' (emphasis added). $\endgroup$ – dave_thompson_085 Aug 24 '17 at 12:19
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Does this consider quantum-computer?

No, it does not. It is generally believed that, because of Shor's algorithm, a Quantum Computer will be able to factor and compute discrete logs (including within an elliptic curve group) in polynomial time, hence algorithms depending on those will be insecure.

As for the symmetric algorithms, the conventional wisdom is that you will need twice the key size to obtain the same level of security.

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