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Quantum computers will seal the fate of conventional encryption techniques. Of these, the hardest hit will be the RSA algorithm used by 99 percent of all applications the encryption standard for any secure transfer and storage of communication data or software updates. What are some solutions to the inevitable?

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    $\begingroup$ "Quantum computers will seal the fate of conventional encryption techniques" is not trivial (so far none of these things have achieve anything useful at least as far as cryptography or exact computations go, and some are skeptics humanity will see that). "The hardest hit will be the RSA" is not trivial (some predict that ECDSA, ECDH, and ECIES will be hit sooner, because they use smaller keys, thus breaking them might need a quantum computer with sizably less qubits). What research have you done to make these statements? And what exactly has this to do with passwords? $\endgroup$ – fgrieu Jun 19 '18 at 16:38
  • $\begingroup$ There is also the issue of who will be able to afford such quantum computers. Certainly nation states but it may be a long time for the to become affordable to general attackers. Also the RSA algorithm is not used by 99 of encryption for secure transfer and storage of communication data or software updates. Data is (in general) encrypted with symmetric algorithms which only lose some security which is easily handles by (generally) doubling the key length. $\endgroup$ – zaph Jun 19 '18 at 18:22
  • $\begingroup$ This is tagged "passwords" but the question doesn't reference passwords. (And the answer is: No, quantum computers won't make password cracking easier.) $\endgroup$ – Future Security Jun 20 '18 at 18:17
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Quantum computers will seal the fate of conventional encryption techniques

This is only somewhat true in regards to asymmetric cryptosystems. Algorithms such as AES256 and XSalsa20 will remain secure even in the face of full scale quantum computation.

the hardest hit will be the RSA algorithm used by 99 percent of all applications the encryption standard for any secure transfer and storage of communication data or software updates.

Both RSA and discrete-logarithm based systems such as Diffie-Hellman (including the Elliptic Curve variants) are vulnerable to Shor's algorithm, and both are widely used. RSA is used more for signatures than for key exchange. RSA is far from a single point of failure and being the only mainstream public-key cryptosystem.

What are some solutions to the inevitable?

It is arguable that Quantum Computing of scale that will impact cryptography is "inevitable". There are non-trivial engineering barriers that have to be overcome.

Solutions

NIST is currently hosting a contest of sorts to find and standardize quantum-resistant asymmetric calgorithms.

Candidate schemes include:

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