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I am trying to validate my RSA implementation for digital signatures with the test vectors provided by NIST. For now, I am focusing on the tests for signature generation (SigGen15) with the PKCS#1 v.15 padding scheme.

Given a message M, the modulus N and the private key D, I need to find the signature S of M. From my understanding, first I need to calculate the hash H of the message N and then create the following sequence of bits:

0x00 | 0x01 | P | 0x00 | S | H

where P is a sequence of OxFF so that this sequence of bits has the same bit length of N, S is the sequence of magic bytes (e.g., for SHA-1 is 0x30 0x21 0x30 0x09 0x06 0x05 0x2b 0x0e 0x03 0x02 0x1a 0x05 0x00 0x04 0x14) and H is the hash of the message M. Then, I can encrypt this sequence with the private key D and the modulus N (power + mod).

Unfortunately, I can't understand how I am supposed to generate the hash H. By using the NIST-generated signature, I can see that the hash code H expected in the message is different from the one I can generate by simply calculating H=sha1(M). Everything else, i.e., the number of bytes in P and the magic code S, is correct. It seems that the message M is manipulated somehow before calculating the corresponding hash code H to be used for the generation of the signature. I checked the documentation but I can't figure out what I am doing wrong.

Thank you so much.

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  • $\begingroup$ "It seems that the message M is manipulated somehow before calculating the corresponding hash code H to be used for the generation of the signature."; nope, it's just the straight hash - something else is the problem $\endgroup$ – poncho Apr 6 at 18:48
  • $\begingroup$ Thank you for your comment. So If I consider the first test of the file SigGen15_186-3.rsp I can see that the expected hash is c8919f9087282f2059f112b55faae3c6462f4469. However if you calculate the hash of M you obtain a different result. Note that I obtained the expected hash by decrypting the expected result (provided by NIST) with OpenSSL. $\endgroup$ – lucas Apr 6 at 18:51
  • $\begingroup$ Perhaps you're not computing the hash correctly; for example, perhaps you're adding a NUL terminator on the message when there's not supposed to be one... $\endgroup$ – poncho Apr 6 at 18:54

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