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I am trying to understand Bulletproofs and it uses the following assumption (Section 2.1): Discrete Log Relation Assumption Note: $\mathbb{G}$ is of prime order $p$.

My question is about the last sentence in the image -- I cannot prove it. Specifically, I want to prove that $(*)$ if Discrete Log Relation is "broken", then the "plain" Discrete Log is also broken. Intuitively this makes sense, but I must be careful since I am just beginning self-learning cryptography.

An attempt for proving $(*)$: To break plain DL, I must find $x\in\mathbb{Z}_p$ s.t. $g^x=h$. Adversary $\mathcal{A}$ breaking DLR for $n=2, g_1 = g, g_2 = -h$ would give $a_1', a_2' \in \mathbb{Z}_p$. However, there is no guarantee that $a_2' = 1$ so that $a_1' = x$, unless there is a way to "convert" $(a_1',a_2')$ to $(x, 1)$. I am stuck here.

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However, there is no guarantee that $a_2' = 1$ so that $a_1' = x$, unless there is a way to "convert" $(a_1',a_2')$ to $(x, 1)$. I am stuck here.

I won't give you an answer (having you find the answer is much better for learning); I will give you a few hints:

  • $g^{a}(g^x)^{b} = 1$ is equivalent to saying that $a + bx = 0 \pmod q$, where $q$ is the order of the element $g$; this is true even if $g^x = h$

  • If we know a value $b \ne 0$, and $q$ is prime, then is it feasible to find a value $b'$ such that $b \cdot b' = 1 \pmod q$?

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