Linked Questions

7
votes
2answers
5k views

If we can find prime numbers larger than 17 milion digits, why can't we find all 1024bit primes? [duplicate]

"Largest Known Prime Number Discovered; Has 17,425,170 Digits" http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130213225424.htm If we can find prime numbers larger than 17 milion digits, why can't we ...
1
vote
1answer
114 views

If someone had a list of all primes, would it be possible for them to factor any integer in polynomial time? [duplicate]

For example, if they somehow got a function that would churn out any arbitrary amount of primes in a row. Could they break the RSA problem then?
1
vote
0answers
89 views

Why is it impractical to generate a semiprime dictionary? [duplicate]

This might be a very simple question. However, I am just learning the concept, so just excuse me. I am wondering why there is not any attempt to generate all semiprime numbers? (as an dict. attack to ...
1
vote
1answer
65 views

Can an attacker predict value of $d$ if attacker already used $n$ for encryption? [duplicate]

In RSA we have value of n and e which is known to sender. If the sender keep maintaining a database of possible n's he can easy calculate $\phi(n)$ because he already know $p$ and $q$ then. $d$ is $e^{...
0
votes
0answers
79 views

Can Big Data attack RSA by just calculating many prime multiplications in advance? [duplicate]

Intro I am somewhat new to cryptography. Repeating the basics of RSA from How are the primes used to generate RSA keys?: Textbooks say the one-way function is merely two primes (with some critical ...
1
vote
0answers
55 views

Will a list of all prime numbers upto certain number of bits compromise crytopgraphic algorithms based on prime factorization? [duplicate]

I understand that many cryptographic algorithms depend on the difficulty of large prime factorization. Will a list of all prime numbers upto certain number of bits make it easy for an attacker to ...
2
votes
0answers
45 views

Are the prime numbers used for RSA encryption known? [duplicate]

I read that one reason why RSA is secure is because it uses a huge number that's called the modulus which is the product of two prime numbers. For maths reasons the prime numbers being prime numbers ...
-2
votes
1answer
7k views

crack RSA encryption

According to Wikipedia RSA definitions are : so we have $n$ and $e$ because $p$ and $q$ are prime so there is only one $p$ & $q$ which fit to n so from n we can have $p$ and $q$ so we have $\phi(...
9
votes
1answer
1k views

Adi Shamir's secret database of all primes

I was going through these presentation slides (PDF) on Crypto 2013. It summarizes the paper, Factoring RSA keys from certified smart cards: Coppersmith in the wild. In the last slide, it was ...
1
vote
1answer
305 views

Is there a big RSA Data Set

Is there a big dataset containing RSA public $(n,e)$ and private keys $d$ and primes $p,q$ where $n = p.q$ ?
-3
votes
1answer
174 views

Can Big Data together with deep neural networks attack RSA by affording the vast calculation of prime multiplications in advance?

This is a spin-off from Can Big Data attack RSA by just calculating many prime multiplications in advance? [duplicate]. Intro I am somewhat new to cryptography. Repeating the basics of RSA from How ...
0
votes
1answer
117 views

Prime Factorization in RSA always leads to the product of two primes?

Lets prime factorize $30$: $$30 = 3 \cdot 10 = 3 \cdot 2 \cdot 5$$ We see that the number $30$ is a product of $3$ primes. But in RSA, when factorizing huge numbers, we always seem to only get two ...