Questions tagged [differential-privacy]

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what does differential privacy (in machine learning) promise or guarantee?

I am recently reading some papers about privacy-preserving machine learning. Some works incorporate the idea of differential privacy to protect the privacy of the training dataset when the model is ...
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Sensitivity of probability measure in differential privacy

I know that we need some sort of sensitivity(global, local) to calculate noise that needs to be added for differential privacy. The noise is the maximum difference between two neighboring datasets. ...
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Why does ε-differential privacy protect the subset of 1/ε edges in terms of graphs?

In the book The Algorithmic Foundations of Differential Privacy by Cynthia Dwork, Aaron Roth on page 24, databases that take the form of graphs are discussed. We could on the other hand consider ...
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Differential privacy and Shamir's scheme

I have been unable to find any proofs (for my own reference) that demonstrate that Shamir's secret sharing scheme does (or does not) satisfy the definition of $\textbf{differential privacy}$ as ...
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Laplace mechanism from Exponential mechanism in Differential Privacy

In McSherry and Talwar's paper which introduces the exponential mechanism for differential privacy, they say that the Laplace mechanism can be captured by choosing the score function as $q(d,r) = - |f(...
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How to analyse the sensitivity in argmax in exponential mechanism of differential privacy?

Consider we have a database $D=[1,2,1,3]$, and the query for $\mathop{\arg\max}_{i} D_i$. So how to analyse the sentivity of the utility function? for the sensitivity of $u$ equals to $\Delta u=\max_{...
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Randomized response with more than 2 options

It is well-known that the binary randomized response mechanism is differentially private, with $\varepsilon=ln(3)$ if each person answers truthfully with probability $0.5$, and uniformly randomly ...