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Calculating the value of a function for given inputs, especially, in the context of secure multi-party computation and/or homomorphic encryption, without disclosing the inputs to some or all parties carrying out the calculation.

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Representing a function as FHE circuit

I am actually trying to study homomorphic encryption (on lattices) but I'm facing a problem. Every paper that I have read so far talk about writing the function to evaluate on ciphertexts as a circuit,...
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0answers
154 views

Share Conversion between Different Finite Fields

Let us have any linear secret sharing scheme (LSSS) that works on some field $Z_{p}$, where p is some prime or a power of a prime e.g., Shamir Secret Sharing, Additive secret Sharing. The problem at ...
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vote
1answer
514 views

SHA-3 Sub-Function Reversibility Clarification

SHA-3 Sub-Function Reversibility Clarification I just finished a very slow and clunky python implementation of SHA-3 (224,256,384,512). The exercise was not designed for speed. My only objective ...
4
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1answer
75 views

Can big numbers multiplication be a valid form of encryption?

I have a vector of int called $Xreg = [x1, x2, ..., xn]$ that I need to send from a client to a server for storage in a database. If an attacker gains access to the database or the server he shouldn'...
5
votes
2answers
247 views

SPDZ for the 2-party case

There exist protocols for 2-party computation e.g., GMW that use Boolean circuits. I could also use Paillier and arithmetic circuits for a 2 party computation. However after reading about SPDZ is my ...
2
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1answer
149 views

A secure function evaluation problem and an alternative of 1 out of n oblivious transfer?

I am considering a "secure function evaluation" problem: Consider two parties: A and B. A has a one-to-one mapping function $f(x)=k$. Basically, the function $f(x)$ can be regarded as a table of two ...
2
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1answer
333 views

Fully Homomorphic Encryption over the Integers - perform an operation on an encrypted data

In Fully Homomorphic Encryption scheme represented here Fully Homomorphic Encryption over the Integers In the Evaluate process (see section “3.1 The Construction” of the paper): $$Evaluate(pk, C, c1, ...
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1answer
270 views

Outsourcing arbitrary computations securely

Consider the following scheme. Alice wants Bob to make some computations for her, but she doesn't want to reveal the data on which he's going to do it. So, she encrypts the data, sends them to Bob, he ...
9
votes
3answers
303 views

How hard is to invert the function that computes the middle-bits of (x^2)?

I'm designing a function f that should be moderately hard to invert and very fast to evaluate in a modern CPU. The function will be used in a proof-of-work function. I've read that the middle-bits of ...
8
votes
2answers
818 views

What criteria make the theta step of Keccak's round function reversible?

From what I've been reading, Keccak's round function is reversible. That's pretty obvious for the $\rho$, $\pi$ and $\iota$ transforms. For $\chi$ to be reversible, $x$'s range has to be odd — but ...
4
votes
1answer
625 views

What's efficient MPC protocol for determining if sum's bigger than y?

My secure multi-party computation (MPC) in need is simply to determine if a sum of two private variable is bigger than a given value $y$, as $f(x_0, x_1) = [(x_0 + x_1) > y]$ in which the value ...
6
votes
2answers
759 views

Alternatives to FHE for secure function evaluation

As a followup to a previous question I asked which was more related to Fully Homomorphic Encryption (FHE), what other cryptographic methods are available for computing a private function on public and/...
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votes
2answers
232 views

Background for modular arithmetic function

I'm investigating this function: $a := ((b\cdot c) \bmod k) - (b \cdot c)/k$ where $/$ indicates integer division. Two things I've noticed: It's equivalent to multiplying a·b, and then ...
14
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2answers
972 views

Why use a 1-2 Oblivious Transfer instead of a 1 out of n Oblivious Transfer?

When initiating an oblivious transfer, why would someone use a 1-2 oblivious transfer rather than going for an 1 out of n oblivious transfer? Perhaps a slight time overhead for the extra message ...