Questions tagged [security-definition]

Questions about formal definitions of "security" for various cryptographic schemes (e.g. perfect secrecy, semantic security, ciphertext indistinguishability, etc.)

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What are preimage resistance and collision resistance, and how can the lack thereof be exploited?

What is "preimage resistance", and how can the lack thereof be exploited? How is this different from collision resistance, and are there any known preimage attacks that would be considered feasible?
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40 votes
8 answers
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Simply put, what does “perfect secrecy” mean?

I would like to ask for a clear (but maybe not so deep) explanation of what the term "perfect secrecy" means. As far as I have researched and understood, it has to do with probabilities of assuming ...
Emyr's user avatar
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32 votes
1 answer
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What do the signature security abbreviations like EUF-CMA mean?

From time to time, one stumbles across formal security definitions. This includes security definitions for signature schemes. The most common ones are the *UF-* ...
SEJPM's user avatar
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31 votes
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Uniform vs discrete Gaussian sampling in Ring learning with errors

The Wikipedia article on RLWE mentions two methods of sampling "small" polynomials namely uniform sampling and discrete Gaussian sampling. Uniform sampling is clearly the simplest, involving simply ...
Morty's user avatar
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21 votes
2 answers
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Why is AES considered to be secure?

The security of RSA is based on the integer factorization problem, which is a very well defined and understood mathematical problem. This problem must be solved in order to fundamentally break RSA. ...
Eiver's user avatar
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20 votes
2 answers
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What stops the Multiply-With-Carry RNG from being a Cryptographically Secure PRNG?

Despite the fact that Marsaglia's MWC PRNG (multiply-with-carry random number generator) is considered to be "the mother of all RNGs", it does not seem to be considered to be a CSPRNG (...
e-sushi's user avatar
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19 votes
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What is the difference between uniformly and at random in crypto definitions?

Very often in the description and analysis of a cryptographic protocol there is a need for a an element $k$ that is sampled uniformly AND at random. Is there a redundancy in the definition with ...
curious's user avatar
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16 votes
6 answers
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How exactly is "true randomness" defined in the realms of cryptography?

Especially in relation to stream ciphers, I frequently read about (sometimes theoretical, sometimes practical) attacks that are able to "distinguish a ciphertext from a truly random stream". What's ...
e-sushi's user avatar
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14 votes
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Does GCM (or GHASH) only provide 64-bit security against forgeries?

In a recent comment a doubt was voiced about my answer, which claims GCM to requires $2^{128}$ for a successful forgery. The doubt was that the square root needs to be taken meaning the security would ...
SEJPM's user avatar
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14 votes
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Meaning of "Security can be reduced to a problem"

I'm studying reductions in cryptography and confused about the way people use the word "reduction". My question is almost the same as a past question, but what I want to ask is slightly different. A ...
rapier's user avatar
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13 votes
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Proofs by reduction and times of adversaries

I have some difficulties to understand, when we construct a reduction, how we determine the time for the constructed adversary to break a target security property. In general these details are not ...
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12 votes
4 answers
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Is the one-time-pad a secure system according to modern definitions?

Occasionally I hear people say that one-time pads are "useless" or even "broken". "modern cryptography knows more security definitions, under some of which the one-time pad is completely broken." ...
David Cary's user avatar
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3 answers
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How small is negligible?

When proving theorems in crypto we often make use of the concept of negligible functions or, more simply, negligible parameters. As a rule of thumb, given today (2018) computational power, what is ...
Rexcirus's user avatar
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12 votes
2 answers
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Definitions of secrecy

I found terms like "forward secrecy", "future secrecy", "backwards secrecy" and "perfect forward secrecy" and I would like to know their definitions and to understand the differences among them. I ...
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11 votes
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Example of a PRP that is not a strong PRP

The exact definition of security for a pseudorandom permutation is straightforward - for some encryption scheme $E\,\colon\,\mathcal{K}\times\mathcal{D}\rightarrow\mathcal{D}$, it must be the case ...
pg1989's user avatar
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Definition of a CSPRNG

I am interested in what conditions are necessary and sufficient to define a cryptographically secure pseudo-random number generator (CSPRNG). Wikipedia lists two defining characteristics: It ...
Dave White's user avatar
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3 answers
2k views

How to prove the security of block ciphers

I see very often proofs of security for asymmetric crypto algorithms, for instance, using reductions to known hard problems, or game based proofs... In the field of protocols (like authentication) it ...
Hilder Vitor Lima Pereira's user avatar
11 votes
1 answer
6k views

Proof that IND$-CPA implies IND-CPA?

I've read a few papers recently that used a notion of security called "indistinguishability from random bits/strings" under chosen plaintext attack, also called IND\$-CPA. See e.g. http://pdf.aminer....
J.D.'s user avatar
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11 votes
1 answer
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What does 'a reduction is tight' mean rigorously?

As far as I know, when someone says 'a reduction is tight', it means that given that there is an adversary $A$ with advantage $\epsilon$ and running time $t$ and another adversary $B$ utilizing $A$ ...
Lee Seungwoo's user avatar
10 votes
1 answer
3k views

Existential unforgeability vs strong unforgeability

In the article https://crypto.stanford.edu/~dabo/pubs/papers/strongsigs.pdf there are two definitions for the security of a digital signature scheme: existential unforgeability and strong ...
Evgeni Vaknin's user avatar
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2 answers
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Key Size for Symmetric Homomorphic Encryption Over the Integers

In the paper Fully Homomorphic Encryption over the Integers, it mentions a symmetric key scheme on page 1 and 2. Key Generation: Pick a random odd number $p \epsilon [2^{N-1},2^N)$ Encrypt A Bit m: $...
Alan Wolfe's user avatar
9 votes
1 answer
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What does it mean for an adversary to run in PPT?

I've been reading this question where a detailed description of mine is given, I've understood that a polynomial-time adversary is an adversary for which the only feasible strategy are those that take ...
Daniel's user avatar
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8 votes
2 answers
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What is a q-type assumption?

I've seen the term "$q$-type assumption" used in a few papers without a definition. A Google search doesn't seem to come up with anything useful either (except the same papers without a definition). ...
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1 answer
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Understanding Twist Security with respect to short Weierstrass curves

I'm trying to understand the "Invalid-curve attacks against ladders" section of SafeCurves Twist Security page and I have difficulties to apply it to short Weierstrass curves. That section claims ...
Ruggero's user avatar
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1 answer
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An unpredictable PRG is secure (Theorem Yao'82)

in the Mr Boneh's online course is stated the following theorem: Let $G:K \to \{0,1\}^n$ be a PRG. “Thm”: if $\forall i \in \{0, … ,n-1\}$ the PRG $G$ is unpredictable at pos. $i$, then $G$ ...
Daniel's user avatar
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8 votes
1 answer
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The notion of sub-exponential security

I have been reading a paper where they construct probabilistic IO (indistinguishability obfuscation) from sub exponential IO. I want to know if the following two notions of sub-exponential security ...
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8 votes
1 answer
167 views

Definition of secure computation with more that two parties

In Definition of secure computation in m-party case with respect to semi-honest adversary (Definition 7.5.1 in Foundations of Cryptography: Volume 2, Basic Applications by Oded Goldriech) we say ...
Mhy's user avatar
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8 votes
1 answer
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Difference between semi-honest and malicious adversary using Ideal Real Model Paradigm

Would you please explain to me why in the security definition of ideal/real model paradigm which is described in the efficient secure two-party protocol book(Hazay, Lindell), the simulator tries to ...
Amirhossein Adavoudi's user avatar
7 votes
2 answers
219 views

Confusion about definition of homomorphic encryption

I am trying to better understand homomorphic encryption, but I feel like I keep getting inconsistent information in the papers that I am reading. One of the papers I am reading says the following: ...
FrostyStraw's user avatar
7 votes
2 answers
3k views

What is the difference between information-theoretic and perfect types of security?

I'm having a hard time pinning down an exact definition of the difference between information-theoretic and perfect types of security. A rigorous definition seems elusive... A. Wikipedia puts the ...
Paul Uszak's user avatar
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7 votes
1 answer
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Proofs of security methodologies

I'm looking for course material on the subject of proofs, reductions, and games, as used to prove cryptographic schemes secure. What are the methodologies? What are the preferred ones? In what cases ...
Dingo13's user avatar
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7 votes
2 answers
4k views

Difference left-or-right CPA security, IND-CPA security

I am trying to understand the notion of left-or-right-CPA (LOR-CPA) security for private-key encryption schemes introduced in my lecture. If I understood it correctly so far, the only difference to ...
Lemon's user avatar
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7 votes
3 answers
633 views

Is there a cryptographic approach to availability

Background Cryptography can be said to provide the tools used to fulfill the goals of information security. The three pillars of information security are confidentiality, integrity, and ...
Ella Rose's user avatar
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6 votes
1 answer
615 views

"Power of one" as input to functions of a cryptosystem

What does $1^\lambda$ mean when you pass it as a parameter to the functions of a cryptosystem. The cryptosystem in question is this and a picture reference is this. I have been told it signifies the ...
Papa Delta's user avatar
6 votes
1 answer
5k views

What exactly is a “security parameter”?

I often encounter the term “security parameter” when I read crypto related stuff. My basic understanding is that it just denotes some bit-length however, I'm not so sure. For example, when it says ...
SpiderRico's user avatar
6 votes
1 answer
875 views

Exact mathematical definition of simulation based security?

I've been trying to understand cryptographic protocols and how to define their security. The problem is that while I can understand what the intuitive definition says, I have trouble understanding how ...
dst's user avatar
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6 votes
1 answer
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Public-Key Deterministic Encryption : Why does not provide perfect security?

I've got a question about an assignment . The question is "Why a Public-Key Deterministic Encryption Algorithm does not provide perfect security ?" . I suppose it means according to Shannon . Any ...
IrishDog's user avatar
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6 votes
1 answer
688 views

What is the difference between RCCA and CCA2?

Well, I know it's easy to tell CCA1 from CCA2, but I failed to find the difference between RCCA and CCA2. What is the difference?
veryflying's user avatar
6 votes
0 answers
130 views

About the complexity of a path finding attack for a path encrypted with a block cipher (like AES). How many AES calculations count as secure?

Out of $N = s^3$ total points we pick a starting point $p$ and an end point $q$ with $$p=(p_1, p_2)$$ $$q=(q_1,q_2)$$ $$p_1,q_1 \in [0,s)$$ $$p_2,q_2 \in [0,s^2)$$ We want to find a path in between ...
J. Doe's user avatar
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5 votes
5 answers
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Effective security of block cipher – equal the key size, or half the key size?

The Wikipedia “Key Size” article states: The security of an algorithm cannot exceed its key length (since any algorithm can be cracked by brute force), but it can be smaller. … … … Most symmetric-...
e-sushi's user avatar
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5 votes
2 answers
980 views

Statistical security parameter -> information theoretically secure

If a cryptographic protocol has a computational security parameter and a statistical security parameter, does this mean it is only computationally secure instead of information-theoretically secure? I ...
HelloWorld123's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
644 views

What does "adaptively secure" mean?

In a paper it says "In the generic group model, the PRF is adaptively secure for inputs of $\mathbb{Z}_q^n$". Maybe a stupid question, but what does "adaptively secure" mean exactly?
user4811's user avatar
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5 votes
2 answers
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Block Ciphers and (Non-)Generic Attacks

I am currently reading through Cryptography Engineering and came across this definition of block cipher security: Definition 2 An attack on a block cipher is a non-generic method of ...
David Brower's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
2k views

Signature with appendix

I see sometimes signatures schemes with appendix. This is about signatures schemes in which the message is needed in the verification algorithm, that is, the ouput of the signature algorithm is of the ...
Dingo13's user avatar
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5 votes
1 answer
654 views

Strong One-Way Function

In the book "Foundations of cryptography-Oded Goldreich-Page 33", if we use the deterministic polynomial-time algorithm instead of the probabilistic polynomial-time algorithm for case 2 (Hard to ...
Amirhossein Adavoudi's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
2k views

IND-CPA security of CTR mode

Let's suppose CTR mode is instantiated such that the input to the block-cipher is $\langle \mathrm{IV}+\mathrm{ctr}\rangle$ instead of $\mathrm{IV}\mathbin\|\langle \mathrm{ctr}\rangle$, where $\...
ironhide012's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
471 views

What is a non-OWF?

We know that A function $f:\Bbb Z_2^n \longrightarrow\Bbb Z_2^m$ is a (strong) one-way function (OWF), if: $f$ can be computed by a PT algorithm. Equivalently, there exists a PPT algorithm that on ...
Chris's user avatar
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5 votes
2 answers
666 views

What is the relationship between entropy conditioning and final output bias in a TRNG?

This question concerns the conditioning and output of true random number generators. It refers to NIST Special Publication 800-90C, Recommendation for Random Bit Generator (RBG) Constructions. It ...
Paul Uszak's user avatar
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5 votes
1 answer
191 views

Parameterizing adversaries with security parameters

In many cryptographic games, the adversary doesn't seem to be parameterized by the security parameter.‡ Are such games equivalent to variants in which the adversary is parameterized by the security ...
user2768's user avatar
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5 votes
1 answer
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Why is the definition of Special-honest verifier zero-knowledge probabilistic?

Let $P$ be a prover willing to prove to a verifier $V$ that he knows a witness $w$ satisfying $(x,w) \in R$ for some relation $R$ and some common input $x$. As found in the literature, $P$ can use a $...
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