Questions tagged [soundness]

Soundness is a property of proof systems that requires no prover can make the verifier accept a wrong statement except with some small probability. The upper bound of this probability is referred to as the soundness error of a proof system.

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Impact of super-polynomial extractors on the security of a zero-knowledge proof

Interactive zero-knowledge arguments are proven to be secure in three parts: completeness (the verifier accepts if the prover is honest) soundness (a dishonest prover cannot convince a verifier) zero-...
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Show that there is an efficient zero knowledge proof for any language $L \in NP$

Let $(P,V)$ be an efficient zero-knowledge interactive proof for some language $A \in NP$ that is $(T,\epsilon)-\text{sound}$ and $(T,\epsilon)-\text{ZK}$. I want to show that for every language $L$ ...
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Auxiliary Input and the Soundness of Arguments

Interactive proof systems are often defined such that the interacting parties have access to some arbitrary auxiliary input, as in e.g. Def 4.2.10 of G where a pair of interactive machines $(P, V)$ ...
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When knowledge soundness implies soundness

In the work of Bellare–Goldreich that defines knowledge soundness BG92, the discussion of Section 4.5 specifically decouples knowledge soundness from soundness. That is, proving knowledge soundness ...
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What does it mean to be “sound”?

I've been reading this in many places and I still don't properly understand what it means to be "sound". As an example of what I am asking for: The Fiat-Shamir transfrom is sound in the ...
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what is the difference between proofs and arguments of knowledge?

What is the difference between proofs and arguments of knowledge in the context of zero-knowledge? I have read this sentence in this ePrint: It is useful to distinguish between zero-knowledge ...