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344
votes
13answers
112k views

Should we MAC-then-encrypt or encrypt-then-MAC?

Most of the time, when some data must be encrypted, it must also be protected with a MAC, because encryption protects only against passive attackers. There are some nifty encryption modes which ...
181
votes
7answers
82k views

How much would it cost in U.S. dollars to brute force a 256 bit key in a year?

I am often told that any key can be broken and that it is only a matter of time and resources for any key to be broken. I know that this is technically true. However, I think that there is probably a ...
162
votes
20answers
23k views

Time Capsule cryptography?

Does there exist any cryptographic algorithm which encrypts data in such a way that it can only be decrypted after a certain period of time? The only idea that I can think of, is something like this: ...
161
votes
1answer
77k views

What are the differences between a digital signature, a MAC and a hash?

A message may be accompanied with a digital signature, a MAC or a message hash, as a proof of some kind. Which assurances does each primitive provide to the recipient? What kind of keys are needed?
151
votes
10answers
37k views

Why is writing your own encryption discouraged?

Say I want to write an encryption algorithm to communicate between me and my friend for this private use. How is that bad? E.g. I can take the word Hello and ...
149
votes
4answers
100k views

Why is elliptic curve cryptography not widely used, compared to RSA?

I recently ran across elliptic curve crypto-systems: An Introduction to the Theory of Elliptic Curves (Brown University) Elliptic Curve Cryptography (Wikipedia) Performance analysis of identity ...
146
votes
4answers
45k views

Should we trust the NIST-recommended ECC parameters?

Recent articles in the media, based upon Snowden documents, have suggested that the NSA has actively tried to enable surveillance by embedding weaknesses in commercially-deployed technology -- ...
133
votes
6answers
57k views

Why can't we reverse hashes?

First off, I know hashes are 1 way. There are an infinite number of inputs that can result in the same hash output. Why can't we take a hash and convert it to an equivalent string that can be hashed ...
109
votes
5answers
69k views

Should we sign-then-encrypt, or encrypt-then-sign?

We often want to send messages that are both (a) encrypted, so passive attackers can't discover the plaintext of the message, and (b) signed with a private-key digital signature, so active attackers ...
108
votes
2answers
95k views

What is the main difference between a key, an IV and a nonce?

What are the main differences between a nonce, a key and an IV? Without any doubt the key should be kept secret. But what about the nonce and the IV? What's the main difference between them and their ...
107
votes
5answers
87k views

Can you help me understand what a cryptographic “salt” is?

I'm a beginner to cryptography and looking to understand in very simple terms what a cryptographic "salt" is, when I might need to use it, and why I should or should not use it. Can anyone offer me a ...
104
votes
7answers
62k views

How big an RSA key is considered secure today?

I think 1024 bit RSA keys were considered secure ~5 years ago, but I assume that's not true anymore. Can 2048 or 4096 keys still be relied upon, or have we gained too much computing power in the ...
98
votes
4answers
62k views

How should I calculate the entropy of a password?

If part of the password is a whole regular English word, does the entropy of that part depend on the number of English words in existence, the number of English words known by the choosing algorithm, ...
94
votes
2answers
16k views

What is the new attack on SHA-1 “SHAttered” and how does it work?

There's a new recent Attack on SHA-1 named "SHAttered" by Google and some researchers. I understand that it uses some fancy new techniques, but not the details. My question is: How? How does the ...
91
votes
3answers
21k views

If WhatsApp cannot read our message, how can the media forwarding happen in an instant?

WhatsApp says even the photos shared on its platform are end-to-end encrypted. When WhatsApp says encrypted I assume the data is encrypted in my device and then sent across to the recipient. When we ...
90
votes
7answers
122k views

Are there two known strings which have the same MD5 hash value?

Is there an example of two known strings which have the same MD5 hash value (representing a so-called "MD5 collision")?
88
votes
7answers
79k views

Taking advantage of one-time pad key reuse?

Suppose Alice wants to send encryptions (under a one-time pad) of $m_1$ and $m_2$ to Bob over a public channel. Alice and Bob have a shared key $k$; however, both messages are the same length as the ...
88
votes
8answers
26k views

How is CipherCloud doing homomorphic encryption?

Much of the literature and latest papers suggest that homomorphic encryption is still not practical yet. How is CipherCloud able to achieve this? Does anyone have an idea? Their website does not ...
85
votes
4answers
11k views

Has SHA256 been broken by Treadwell Stanton DuPont?

In a recent press release issued by Treadwell Stanton DuPont, the claim is made that their research laboratories have successfully broken all 64 rounds of the SHA256 hashing algorithm. They further ...
83
votes
11answers
9k views

Is modern encryption needlessly complicated?

RSA, DES, AES, etc., all use (relatively) complicated mathematics to encrypt some message with some key. For each of these methods, there have been several documented vulnerabilities found over the ...
83
votes
8answers
11k views

Guarding against cryptanalytic breakthroughs: combining multiple hash functions

Assume I want to design a protocol (or data format or similar) including some cryptographic hash, and want it to be as future-proof as possible, i.e. I want to avoid that breakthroughs in cryptography ...
82
votes
5answers
35k views

Is AES-256 weaker than 192 and 128 bit versions?

From a paper via Schneier on Security's Another AES Attack (emphasis mine): In the case of AES-128, there is no known attack which is faster than the 2128 complexity of exhaustive search. However, ...
79
votes
10answers
15k views

In end-to-end encryption, doesn't the server need to be trusted?

Applications like WhatsApp use end to end encryption. WhatsApp says that only the users share a specific key and no third party can view the messages. But I do not understand how the two users agree ...
79
votes
6answers
72k views

How can I generate large prime numbers for RSA?

What is the currently industry-standard algorithm used to generate large prime numbers to be used in RSA encryption? I'm aware that I can find any number of articles on the Internet that explain how ...
76
votes
1answer
102k views

What is the difference between PKCS#5 padding and PKCS#7 padding

One runtime platform provides an API that supplies PKCS#5 padding for block cipher modes such as ECB and CBC. These modes have been defined for the triple DES, AES and Blowfish block ciphers. The ...
75
votes
9answers
104k views

Should I use ECB or CBC encryption mode for my block cipher?

Can someone tell me which mode out of ECB and CBC is better, and how to decide which mode to use? Are there any other modes which are better?
75
votes
2answers
16k views

Why doesn't SSH use TLS?

Most cryptographically protected protocols use TLS these days. This applies to mail protocols, HTTP and many others. The newly designed QUIC has also adopted TLS as its cryptography layer. However, ...
74
votes
8answers
8k views

Layman's explanation of encryption backdoors

In the media, I sometimes read about "backdoors" in encryption algorithms. I'd like to understand what such a backdoor actually consists of. Is it: a) a hidden weakness in the math formulas that ...
74
votes
5answers
250k views

How secure is AES-256?

The cipher AES-256 is used among other places in SSL/TLS across the Internet. It's considered among the top ciphers. In theory it's not crackable since the combinations of keys are massive. Although ...
73
votes
5answers
11k views

How come Public key cryptography wasn't discovered earlier?

I became interested in crypto lately and read about symmetric and public key crypto algorithms. I understand how crucial the discoveries of the 1970s like RSA, DES and DH were in advancing the ...
73
votes
2answers
15k views

What is the “Random Oracle Model” and why is it controversial?

What is the "Random Oracle Model"? Is it an "assumption" akin to the hardness of factoring and discrete log? Or something else? And why do some researchers have a strong distrust of this model?
72
votes
8answers
22k views

How do I explain zero knowledge proof to my 7 year old cousin? [duplicate]

How do I explain zero knowledge proof to my 7 year old cousin?
72
votes
4answers
75k views

What are the practical differences between 256-bit, 192-bit, and 128-bit AES encryption?

AES has several different variants: AES-128 AES-192 AES-256 But why would someone prefer use one over another?
70
votes
2answers
110k views

How does RSA signature verification work?

I understand how the RSA algorithm works for encryption and decryption purposes but I don't get how signing is done. Here's what I (think) I know and is common practice: If I have a message that I ...
70
votes
1answer
121k views

What is the difference between CBC and GCM mode?

I am trying to learn more about GCM mode and how it differs between CBC. I already know that GCM provides a MAC which is used for message authentication. From what I have read, and from the code ...
68
votes
3answers
63k views

How does one attack a two-time pad (i.e. one time pad with key reuse)?

My question might appear the same as the question Taking advantage of one-time pad key reuse?, but actually I did read all the answers and none of them helped me with the details I need. I am new to ...
65
votes
5answers
28k views

How are primes generated for RSA?

As I understand it, the RSA algorithm is based on finding two large primes (p and q) and multiplying them. The security aspect is based on the fact that it's difficult to factor it back into p and q. ...
64
votes
4answers
31k views

How can I use asymmetric encryption, such as RSA, to encrypt an arbitrary length of plaintext?

RSA is not designed to be used on long blocks of plaintext like a block cipher, but I need to use it to send a large (encrypted) message. How can I do this?
64
votes
4answers
13k views

Why does the FBI ask Apple for help to decrypt an iPhone?

The current debate of the FBI trying to get Apple to assist in decrypting an iPhone made me wonder: Normally, upon turning on an iPhone, everything is decrypted using a 4-digit pin (or actually, a ...
61
votes
1answer
5k views

Why does my SSH private key still work after changing some bytes in the file?

I (for a test) just randomly altered a private RSA key by opening it up in Vim and changing a few bytes. It is the private part of an SSH key pair used for logging in on a remote system. Puzzlingly, ...
61
votes
5answers
29k views

Technical feasibility of decrypting https by replacing the computer's PRNG

Intel has an on-chip RdRand function which supposedly bypasses the normally used entropy pool for /dev/urandom and directly injects output. Now rumors are going on that Intel works together with the ...
59
votes
4answers
43k views

SHA512 faster than SHA256?

I'm getting this strange result that SHA512 is around 50% faster than SHA256. I'm using .net's SHA512Managed and SHA256Managed ...
59
votes
6answers
9k views

Soft question: Examples where lack of mathematical rigour cause security breaches?

Cryptographic tools can often become adopted even when their security proofs lack mathematical rigour - or altogether missing. Are there famous cases of security breaches in the industry, where the ...
59
votes
1answer
41k views

Can you explain Bleichenbacher's CCA attack on PKCS#1 v1.5?

I've studied that the Bleichenbacher's CCA attack on PKCS#1 v1.5. is a base to many versions of attacks in the area. I'm trying to understand that attack, but every explanation I saw starts with the ...
58
votes
2answers
36k views

Impacts of not using RSA exponent of 65537

This RFC says the RSA Exponent should be 65537. Why is that number recommended and what are the theoretical and practical impacts & risks of making that number higher or lower? What are the ...
57
votes
2answers
61k views

What are the advantages of TOTP over HOTP?

HMAC-based One Time Password (HOTP) was published as an informational IETF RFC 4226 in December 2005. In May, 2011, Time-based One-time Password Algorithm (TOTP) officially became RFC 6238. What ...
55
votes
2answers
10k views

Is the software that uses PGP broken, or is it PGP itself?

PGP is all over the news (even on TV) and there seems to be a lot of confusion about it. For the time being, people face articles like Attention PGP users: new vulnerabilities require you to take ...
55
votes
3answers
1k views

Do these new insights into prime numbers affect encryption security?

Quanta Magazine reports: Two mathematicians have uncovered a simple, previously unnoticed property of prime numbers [...]. Prime numbers, it seems, have decided preferences about the final digits ...
54
votes
3answers
9k views

Hashing or encrypting twice to increase security?

Over on the bitcoin forums I asked why the bitcoin client computes SHA-256(SHA-256(x)) as its cryptographic hash for a variety of purposes. The leading theory--since the bitcoin author has disappeared-...
54
votes
2answers
106k views

What is safer: ZipCrypto or AES-256?

Like in title: which one of these encryption methods (ZipCrypto, AES-256) is more secure and why? I am asking about it because I'd like to know which should be preferred when compressing files with ...

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