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A cryptographic hash algorithm is a function which takes a variable size input and produces a fixed size output. The algorithm makes it difficult to find two inputs with the same output or reconstruct the input from the output.

2
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Suppose that $h:Z\rightarrow X$ is a cryptographic hash function. … For simplicity, let's model your restrictions $h|_{X}:X\rightarrow X$ of cryptographic hash functions by random functions since random functions can be studied mathematically. …
answered Aug 31 '21 by Joseph Van Name
2
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0answers
It seems like using too many irreversible components in a cryptographic hash function may destroy the security properties of a hash function since non-injective components may make it much easier to find … Cellular automata based hash functions should fit some of these requirements, though I do not know if anyone is using or seriously considering using CA based hash functions in practice. …
asked Mar 6 '18 by Joseph Van Name
10
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2answers
not contain any such algorithmic overhead (the only irreversibility that is required in a cryptographic hash function is that unless one wants to keep the hash around forever, one must eventually delete … the hash). 1) Are there any symmetric cryptosystems which are specifically designed to be used by reversible computers? …
asked Feb 14 '18 by Joseph Van Name
1
vote
It seems like most symmetric cryptosystems could be modified to make completely reversible cryptosystems without the need for garbage or ancilla bits in such a way that the security level is likely to …
answered Mar 3 '18 by Joseph Van Name
1
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So it turns out that there is nothing strange about the composition of random permutations of order 2. The thing is that the distribution of the size of the orbit of an element under the operation $g\ …
answered Apr 18 '18 by Joseph Van Name
1
vote
1answer
In particular, could there be any security weakness that arises from a cryptographic hash function that arises from the Matyas–Meyer–Oseas construction from the encryption function $E$? …
asked Feb 10 '18 by Joseph Van Name
0
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0answers
Have any of these objective measures of security been taken into consideration when evaluating the cryptographic security of block ciphers, cryptographic hash functions, or other cryptographic objects … For this post, I am interested not only in block ciphers that are used for symmetric encryption but also in block ciphers that are used for other purposes such as constructing cryptographic hash functions …
asked Jan 9 by Joseph Van Name