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As we know, Common method for encrypting data is to divide a plaintext in the blocks and xor the plaintext with a pseudo random string, this is what CBC does. In GCM, IV is 96 bit which is a nonce, so first counter block is IV followed by 32 bit number '1'. ${IV \parallel 1}$, here the pseudo random string is generated by the encrypting(here AES 256) the o/p ...


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We don't even have to carefully analyze its variant of CBC mode. The webpage for rsyncrypto says it all: This modification ensures that two almost identical files, such as the same file before an after a change, when encrypted using rsyncrypto and the same key, will produce almost identical encrypted files Whatever they are doing (reusing IVs, etc), and ...


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Maybe it's actually not snake-oil, but at best it's redundant. The first part of its detail that I'd call redundant is the fact that it uses RSA to encrypt a per-file key that they for some reason call "session" key. There is I believe a mode of operation of block cipher that's rsync-friendly, and it's the XTS disk encryption mode. Yes, if you can ...


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