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10

There's simply no way to know. I find it very unlikely that AES will be vulnerable to a ciphertext-only attack in the next 20 years (remember, it has been around for over 20 years already and attacks haven't gotten very far). There's no reason to believe the same won't be true for ChaCha20. If you use a good cipher with 256-bit keys (to avoid potential ...


1

Because all requests are encrypted with the session key, can that act as a form of proof that the client is the real owner of the session ID? e.g. If the session ID somehow is stolen, it can still not be used to communicate to the backend as you still would need to have ownership over the shared secret. That depends. I don't see any explicit check for this ...


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