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Unfortunately, I cannot find the link, but I have read that some mathematician in the 18th or 19th century already had the idea that functions whose inverse function cannot be calculated with the known methods can be used for what we call "asymmetric encryption" today. This means that the basic idea of asymmetric encryption was already known before ...


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Yes, sure it would be feasible to do modular exponentiation with electro-mechanical machine, that was built especially for this computations. Furthermore, if this technique (of public key) would be known, the operation of "project ultra" was impossible, or much harder, because it was based on the fact that each day, a new symmetric key was ...


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Sure, you can do Diffie-Hellman or RSA by hand if you have to. And you don't need the bit length we use today with powerful adversaries. I'm not an expert on WW2 computational machines but I won't be surprised if something to do modular exponentiation could be built using WW2 technology given sufficient motivation. A modern cryptographer in WW2 could make ...


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