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The TLS 1.3 handshake works as follows: The client will send a "ClientHello" data structure to the server. At this stage, the client does not yet know which "Groups" the server supports. To avoid an extra round-trip to the server, it can speculatively contain a "group element" for the group it would prefer to use. In the case ...


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Thank you for your comment. I have solved the problem. The solution is given below.


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Terminology is important here. A cryptographic salt's main purpose is to secure passwords during reuse and avoid hash pre-computation. So yes, that provides your domain separation. But your question is about randomness extraction from arbitrary sources i.e including devices. NIST's SP800 90B "Recommendation for the Entropy Sources Used for Random Bit ...


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Let suppose $\mathcal{B}$ knows how to compute $g^{x(a+b+c)}$, and I want to solve the cdh challenge $(g,X,Y)$, (we will interpret $X$ as $g^x$ and $Y$ as $g^b$) we choose scalars $d,e$ which correspond to $(a+b)$ and $(b+c)$ and we compute $Z=\mathcal{B}(X, g^d\cdot Y^{-1}, Y, g^e\cdot Y^{-1},X^d, X^e )$. We return $\frac{X^{d+e}}{Z}$. Proof: $DLog \left(\...


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