New answers tagged

1

There are modes that are "deterministic", in the sense that each invocation of encryption does neither depend on a random number generator for a random IV, nor depend on a state being kept for a nonce. NIST SP 800-38F Key-wrapping mode is one such example, AES-GCM-SIV is another. An earlier question has attracted some useful answers that may be ...


0

There are two possibilities related to your "search" (partial or exact) and you do not specify which you're using. Let us imagine the plaintext is ATTACK AT DAWN. Let us suppose that the encryption translates this to QWWQTHXQWXBQNO: each letter is encoded as a different letter regardless of its position (so, A is always encrypted as Q and so on). ...


1

ECB is weak because a given 128 bit input block maps to the same encrypted output block. The only thing you can do is look for matches between blocks of the encrypted flag and outputs in the known plaintext ciphertext pairs file. Essentially for each 128 bit chunk of ASCII text in the flag E(plaintext)=ciphertext. The known plaintext ciphertext pair file is ...


Top 50 recent answers are included