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Maarten's answer is good, but doesn't mention that it's possible to have human-memorable typeable passphrases with >128 bits of entropy rather easily. The Diceware system uses a good RNG (high-quality dice or a CSPRNG) to pick "characters" from an enormous "alphabet": instead of using single English letters (or ASCII characters) the &...


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The key size for AES is chosen as 256 because that's considered the minimum keysize which can protect against a brute force attack - i.e. $2^{256}$ tries. That's not right, $2^{128}$ or - more accurately - a key size of 128 bits for $2^{127}$ tries on average is considered plenty, certainly against any practical attack. However, in practice, for a lot of ...


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Adding characters to an existing password in such a fixed and known way does not alter its entropy as long as everything else remains the same. In your specific case, adding a space every four characters can be seen as purely formatting to make passwords more readable. Should an attacker not know about the formatting, the password just became six characters ...


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