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4

The usual lectures about the (in)securities of SHA-1 will be skipped. The standard defining SHA-1 is NIST FIPS 180 (recent revision(s)), it specifies how to pad a bit-string into a form suitable for processing in the compression function specified for SHA-1, which it also specifies. As of 2019, all current SHA-series hash functions are single-pass - that ...


1

"Could you use an MAC as an HMAC? That is, does a MAC satisfy the same properties that an HMAC satisfies?" No, only HMAC is a HMAC. And of course any common MAC can be used in the same role as HMAC, as HMAC is just a MAC after all. However, terms can be confusing here. HMAC is a specific algorithm, however MAC can have two different meanings: MAC could be ...


5

HMAC is a type of MAC. The output of a MAC is called a "tag". Not all MAC (algorithms) are HMAC. MACs are not required to be one-way or collision resistant for someone who knows the key. HMAC, however, inherits the one-way-ness and collision resistance of the underlying hash function. A CBC-based MAC is mentioned as a hint because it is almost trivial to ...


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