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I'm new to cryptography too, but recently I'm working on an SSL project. Here are more details in the instruction about an SSL handshake process(TLS 1.2 and TLS 1.3) What the SSL handshake process does is generate a symmetry-key by using asymmetric encryption. Before the key exchange step, the client or server(or both) will check the other's identity, which ...


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TLS (the proper name for what you're calling SSL) does provide end-to-end integrity guarantees; that is, the receiver can know that what they got is exactly what the sender sent. However, it is a point-to-point protocol; any message (recorder) is from a specific sender and to a specific receiver. One way to look at it is like it's a secure 'pipe'; one side ...


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Yes. An SSL connection provides confidentiality and integrity of the transmission: an adversary (someone who is neither of the two communicating parties) cannot find or check what data was transmitted, and cannot modify the transmitted data. The adversary cannot replay data either. With respect to confidentiality, note that an adversary can observe which ...


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Yes, TLS can provide end-to-end encryption, integrity and authenticity of messages for transport - it's not called Transport Layer Security without a reason. You need to establish trust both parties though: if you cannot identify the clients then the adversary can masquerade as one and will probably receive the message as well. Generally with PKIX you need ...


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