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5

You can't under a standard assumption known as the "Decisional NTRU Assumption". This is essentially the statement that NTRU public keys are pseudorandom. The following is definition 4.4.4 of A Decade of Lattice Cryptography. NTRU Learning Problem: For an invertible $s\in R_q^*$, and distribution $\chi$ on $R$, define $N_{s, \chi}$ to be the ...


3

A Keystore is a concept how crytographic material like keys and certicates are stored. So everything that allows that can be considered to be one, e.g. a directory containing files (e.g. when using OpenSSL) or a database or a single file with a particular structure. There are standards for the latter, e.g PKCS#12 or standards defined by programming languages ...


2

A keystore is a computer subsystem that stores cryptographic keys. You can arrange for a key to be stored in it and use the key later in some way. That's the only characteristic you can always expect from something called a keystore. A keystore may or may not have stronger protections than the rest of the system, such as preventing direct access to its ...


2

The loops are disjoint. In other words, the first loop completes and then the second loop starts. A=B=i=j=0 are explicitly initialised to zero as in many languages failing to specify an initial value can lead to unspecified behaviour (e.g. setting the variables to random values lying in old memory). This initialisation and the initialisation of v occur ...


1

A block cipher as a permutation (family) is not "selected" explicitly: because any such permutation is huge and can not be fully generated and analyzed. Instead, a designer creates a computational circuit / algorithm of a block cipher. We can not directly check for the permutation properties you think of, e.g. number of fixed points, small loops, ...


1

In order to argue the security of a block cipher, designers try to use design rationals that provide decent security against known cryptanalysis techniques. Famous cryptanalysis techniques are statistical cryptanalyses like differential and linear cryptanalysis and structural attacks like algebraic cryptanalysis. For the first technique, designers try to use ...


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