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but can pretend to be the client and see what the client is sending No, the eavesdropper can't see what either side is sending except the ciphertext and size of the ciphertext. To eavesdrop on any connection where the server is authenticated, the eavesdropper has to be able to convince the client that he is the server, which the eavesdropper cannot. Doesn'...


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The definition of soundness for an interactive (zero-knowledge) proof says that no prover can convince a verifier of a false statement (i.e., one not in the language in question), except with tiny probability. In your “Bob in the middle” scenario the statement is true—the graph is 3-colorable—so there is no violation of soundness if “Bob” proves it by ...


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In this case, you have two different threat models and two different types of attacks that both need to be considered. The solution that a typical TLS connection (HTTPS or WSS connection) provides is an encrypted connection between a server, which is authenticated, and a client, who typically is not (but may be). This means that data between the client and ...


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