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8

The others had a fixed number of rounds (32 for Serpent, 16 for Twofish, etc.) regardless of the key size. Why was this? Is there some cryptographic attack which is unique to Rijndael which would warrant this? During the second AES conference, the Rijndael team was asked about this design decision. They turned it around, and pointed out that smaller keys ...


1

Well, you could just google it! This is the top 100,000 broken passwords from the UK's National Cyber Security Centre (GCHQ). It's probably trustworthy. Top password is 123456. Probably shouldn't use it then. That article is dated 21 April 2019, which is a while ago. Not sure when updates will happen, but again, more googling... Your note could also refer ...


0

The problem is that some tests require much larger individual bitstreams than is supplied as parameter, and this software is neither written robustly, nor well-tested with small parameters. In particular, test [09] Overlapping Template Matchings with block length(m) left to the default 9 seems to crash when the tool is passed a parameter less than 1032 or so....


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I think that you have to accept Maarten's "eye-blinkingly bad code" comment. Both NIST STS and the NIST 800-90B entropy assessment tools (especially ea_non_iid) have coding errors, spelling mistakes and example sample data that fails it's own tests when they should pass. igamc is an example of poor/non existent error trapping. It's an arithmetic ...


2

The NIST PQC project had started since 2016, deadline for entry had passed on November 2017. But according to NIST-IR-8309, they are still open to new ideas. So what are they looking for? They said this (on page 26): NIST is pleased with the progress of the PQC standardization effort but recognizes that current and future research may lead to promising ...


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