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1

The simplest solution to this would be to encrypt Bob's pass phrase under Alice's pass phrase. In particular the following steps would be carried out for that: Generate a salted password hash (using e.g. Argon2 or bcrypt) from Alice's pass phrase, call it $SK$ Use $SK$ to encrypt Bob's pass phrase symmetrically, e.g. using AES-GCM If you want to be fancy ...


7

Technically these two strings have the same entropy I believe: We cannot tell how much entropy is in a string by looking at it, as it depends on how it is generated and if the values cannot be predicted by other means. For instance, you just posted these strings on this site, so they would not contain (almost) no entropy when used as keys. Your strings ...


-2

Yes and no. The strings certainly both have the same Kolmogorov complexity. Some here loosely generalise the cryptographic definition of entropy as Kolomogorov complexity = entropy. That's not quite correct and confusing. Kolmogorov complexity is the thing that cryptographers are interested in when assessing the strength of passwords and seeds. Entropy (...


1

To calculate a pepperedPassword I can either just concatenate two values: Bcrypt limits the password. This means that if the password is too long (longer than 56 bytes), it will simply be truncated. If you just attach the pepper to the password, there is a high risk that this will happen. Then the pepper's security gain could even be lost without being ...


2

Computers operate on bits and bytes internally. They do not operate on (hexadecimal) characters. Characters are for human consumption. Hexadecimals use only 4 bits out of a possible 8 in each byte, assuming 8 bit ASCII or compatible encoding. To perform any calculation such as bit shifting, addition or modular multiplication, you'd first have to convert the ...


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