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An alternative is to encrypt the phone number as proposed in the previous answers. For example, Mobile connect identity service encrypts the MSISDN (aka phone number) using a specific algorithm. This GSMA specification gives information about decoding the payload : Following are the example of encrypted MSISDN passed: with URL encoding: login_hint=...


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In the general sense, The problem is known as the small input space on the hash functions, and in short simple hashing won't be secure. If you hash data ( here a phone number) and an attacker tries to find an input value that matches the hash value is called the pre-image attack. In a secure Cryptographic hash functions pre-image attack requires $\mathcal{O}(...


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It is always a bad idea to hash data that has a limited set of length or characters. A phone number in Germany for example has normally no more than 12 digits. The first digit is always a 0 and the vast majority of numbers is longer as 3 digits, as those are normally reserved for emergency services. This effectively leaves us with 10^11-10^3 possible ...


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As an alternative, you can salt the phone numbers to avoid pre-calculation attacks. A known salt will help against an adversary who has already done a hash of all possible phone numbers but just adds one order of magnitude of work (the adversary just has to recalculate all the hashs with the salted phone numbers). If you can keep the salt private raises the ...


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No, it is not a good idea to hash phone numbers. There are only a limited number of phone numbers, so it is pretty easy for an adversary to try and hash all of them. Then you can simply compare the hash of each with the stored hash. Generally you don't have to deal with all telephone numbers, only a subsection of phone numbers anyway (for a specific country ...


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But is there a way without a trusted third party? Sure, one of the simpler solutions is probably to use Yao's Garbled Circuit Protocol to compute the AND gate. Note that actually using the original protocol will do here because the modern speed-ups are only important for large numbers of ANDs and malicious security would also be somewhat useless as a ...


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With this zero knowledge proof, the prover attempts to prove that he knows an opening of the commitment. The obvious way to approach this is to show that, if the prover is able to complete the protocol for two different challenges, he is able to construct an opening of the commitment (and hence he actually knows what he is attempting to prove knowledge of). ...


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These decisions are driven by silicon. Most specifications for hardware are built around a minimally viable CMOS implementation (ex: MPEG-1, lightweight cryptography via NIST 8114). This is particularly true in commodity parts, such as cell phones. When you make wireless ICs, you have two clocks in the system at a minimum, which are the carrier frequency ...


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