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Yes, the NIST tests are a little opaque. You'll find that the input file size should be (no. bitstreams) * (no. bits for testing). That means the input file will be automatically partitioned into (no. bitstreams) fragments, and the test suite run that times. Yo don't have to do anything. That creates the output histogram and the final P value ...


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No, it won‘t be anything near perfect secrecy. You cannot prove a stream cipher to be theoretically secure without using a TRNG. The secrecy of your stream cipher completely relies on the stream generator. A stream cipher that uses a TRNG is what‘s called a One Time Pad - that‘s by definition. While CSPRNGs are able to give you good secrecy too, one can no ...


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This is a standard concept in cryptography, and it is called a stream cipher. It doesn't give ‘perfect’ secrecy, which is a red herring, but it is the modern standard for how to do cryptography—for example, your web browser is almost certainly using exactly this principle right now to talk to the crypto.stackexchange.com web server, using either AES-GCM or ...


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440 and 888 are the maximal values of seed length, that, when concatenated with 1 octet, yields a input to SHA256 and SHA512 respectively, requiring only 1 invocation of the compression function. These values are fixed in such way that, it precludes the use of other hash functions, even ones approved as SHA3. However, if one wants, the above rule can be ...


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