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Of course $AES_{K_1} \oplus AES_{K_2}$ will pass as that's a pseudorandom function. One $AES$ isn't meant to be. But how can you prove that empirically? PractRand is written by one guy (sorry Chris). It's not used in the mainstream literature. TRNG's are principally validated using dieharder or NIST STS. Randomness has been well studied but PractRand hasn't. ...


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I know you said that "without having to all sync up with each other" but other people mentioned the blockchain so I wanted to mention a cool paper I read: https://jbonneau.com/doc/BGB17-IEEESB-proof_of_delay_ethereum.pdf This paper solves problems with using block hashes as randomness. If you simply use the block hash as your randomness source, you ...


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A possibility is to rely on jointly observable, untemperable and apparently random, physical processes. There is one such phenomenon which is very commonly mentioned in the cryptographic community, though this is more as an indication of feasibility than as a concrete and well-fleshed proposal: extracting common randomness from the dark spots of the sun. ...


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I'd suggest taking a look at the Truestamp Observable Entropy project. We recently created this to address a need for the type of randomness you're asking about. Observable Entropy automatically collects randomness from publicly verifiable sources every five minutes, storing and hashing the contents of that retrieved data. The hash of each data source file ...


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The exact official trade price of a publicly traded stock at a given time is very expensive to control: throwing a lot of money at it will definitely let you influence it, but not control all the digits. Average over multiple stocks and you get a value that's public and effectively impossible to fully control or predict. Of course there's significant bias in ...


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Converting an arbitrary message into a pseudo random number is essentially computing a cryptographic hash. So this question seems to be asking what is the fastest secure cryptographic hash? It is unclear what are the security requirements you have for this hash, some algorithms are very simple and have are not cryptographically secure but still provide ...


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Warning: I'm a newbie TL;DR. The fastest pre-shared key encryption algorithm, contains the fastest CSPRNG (it just adds that it XORs input against it). You may want to only modify one such that it ignores the input (e.g. doesn't XOR against the input because we don't want to encrypt). Assuming you ask about cryptographically secure PRNGs: If you want ...


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