16

The Applied Cryptography Second Edition goes back to 1996. Although there is a 20th-anniversary edition, 2015, it is not updated as one thought. If you look for Schneier's style, you may look at the Cryptography Engineering: Design Principles and Practical Applications, 2010 There is also another nice practical book by Jean-Philippe Aumasson Serious ...


11

Here is a blog where Scott Aaronson wrote about this, including a link to the NSA document. That link is however now broken, but the blog contains all of the needed text. An alternative copy of the document is provided here or on the internet archive.


5

Well, you asked for a reference, and that's what Applied Cryptography (AC) is. But you also mentioned real world problems, so note that if you're going to actually do anything, a reference book will not tell you what to do, and how to do it, it will just give a pile of parts and a box of tools and leave the responsibility to you. Given we're talking ...


4

This is an obscure and not peer-reviewed article of dubious quality (I'm being polite). It has far too many flaws to list here. It should be best left ignored. The author did not publish a reference implementation, and the software they used is most likely just a proof-of-concept, not usable in practice.


4

The reference for the claim is here, titled "Second Preimages on $n$-bit Hash Functions for Much Less than $2^n$ Work" by J. Kelsey, B. Schneier. The attack is specific to un-truncated Merkle-Damgaard hash functions. I haven't understood the mechanism of the attack, but as far as I understood, it require some unrealistically large working memory ...


3

This depends a bit on your background and what you are interested in. Philosophically speaking, zero-knowledge proofs are easy to understand (correctness, soundness and zero-knowledge), while the technical details often can be very complex. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zero-knowledge_proof for a nice intro and non-cryptographic examples. I think the ...


3

It is the hidden weighted bit function. There is more than one paper related to cryptographic applications of this function, but the full definition may be found, for example, in Chapter 3 of this paper: Cryptographic properties of the hidden weighted bit function


3

Korea has its own standard for hash and block cipher, such as LSH (for hash) and ARIA (for block cipher). Source code can be found in here. I cannot find the English page, but google translator seems to work well. You can find information about standardization and other documents on the website, e.g. here. The above-linked site KISA is itself authoritative ...


2

Regarding Japan, to my knowledge the JIS standards are just mapped to ISO standards, and I do not know of any main stream hash that is unique to Japan. The JIS standard for hash functions (ハッシュ関数 is hash function if you want to just google around and translate) is JIS X 5057-2, and that is just basically a translation of ISO 10118-2. I also know that the ...


2

Rijndael follows (like all decent cryptographic algorithms, to my knowledge) the principles of confusion and diffusion, formulated by Claude Shannon. Confusion means the ciphertext depends on the plaintext and the key in a highly nonlinear way, i.e. the function that calculates a specific output bit from the input (plaintext, key) is not a polynomial of low ...


2

I am the author of the paper. It is a stupid typo. $z_b$ should be $r_b$. I have corrected the error in my own copy but I can not correct the copy that is out there officially. Apologies. My bad!


2

Long to write as a comment; Look at the referenced paper 47 The user chooses uniformly at random $t$ numbers $y_1,\ldots,y_t \in Z_n^{+}$ such that $y_b$ is a $\text{QNR}$ and $y_j$ , for $j \neq b$, is a $\text{QR}$. It sends these $t$ numbers to DB (total of $t \cdot k$ bits). The database, DB, computes for every row $r$ a number $z_r \in Z_N^*$ as ...


2

DannyNiu's provide the article, and this is going to provide the details; This work has a serious result on the security of the iterated hash functions (MD- construction). From $n$-bit hash function we want $2^{n/2}$ collision resistance and $2^n$ preimage and secondary preimages resistances. They showed that Damgard-Merkle construction cannot satisfy this ...


1

BKZ was described in Lattice basis reduction: improved practical algorithms and solving subset sum problems by C. P. Schnorr, M. Euchner in 1994. As the title suggests, it was first used for solving the subset sum problem. https://academic.microsoft.com/paper/2126483728


1

The most compact stateless post-quantum digital signature scheme currently under consideration by NIST would be Falcon. The next closest contestant is Dilithium.


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