New answers tagged

2

When NIST made the call for AES, they were trying to address short comings of DES that had a 56-bit key (64-bits with parity). I got the following information from NIST while at the NIST 8114 conferences because I was complaining about having to keep 192-bit key compatibility in my SIMON hardware when no one would likely use it. The summary: In 1997, ...


2

For this kind of problem, the cryptographic algorithm/protocol designers, usually, presents test vectors for their designs. You can find some of them in books, too. In your case, AES is standardized by NIST on May 26, 2002, and they provide test vectors in Appendix F of NIST 800-38A for various mode of encryption. Before the standardization on November 26, ...


Top 50 recent answers are included