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6

They are different concepts and have different approaches. AES like any block cipher is a primitive and the encryption is performed by using the block cipher mode of operation. Like ECB,CBC,CTR,GCM,EAX... The pkcs#7 padding or any other padding that is used to fill the last block to the block size with ambiguous remove, not designed for randomization. Even ...


6

RSA is almost always used in hybrid mode, where AES (or another symmetric cipher) is used to encrypt the data itself, and RSA is then used to encrypt the random data key. That way RSA has only a static overhead: the modulus size (which is also the key size) in bytes. So for RSA-1024 that would mean an overhead of 128 bytes + whatever overhead is required for ...


5

I don't see a point of using RSA for password hashing. Using SHA and RSA will not make the bruteforce attack slower. The massive GPU/ASIC attacks will still work if we assume the public key $(e,n)$ is known. That is why we need memory hard functions to make the attacks slower. Sticking the standard is still better like using Argon2id ( Argon2 was the winner ...


4

What you are describing is called pepper. What you are doing is just using RSA as a cryptographic hash function. That probably reduces performance and makes your system more complicated. Generally, people install a random number directly in to the program as a literal. It is safe as long as your source code and binary is safe. You could use it as an RSA key, ...


4

In the case you choose $e$ first, you get a private exponent $d$ equivalent to the usual one. Since it is private, no vulnerability can arise. In other words, it is not possible even to distinguish whether you use standard RSA or this variant. In the case you choose $d$ first, then $e$ may leak a lot of information. For example, in the Boneh-Durfee attack on ...


2

Rainbow tables are essentially an optimized dictionary attack, which rely on two assumptions: That two different applications will hash the same input to the same output, e.g. the password "Password123" will always hash to "42f749ade7f9e195bf475f37a44cafcb". This allows the attacker to re-use a rainbow table database to attack multiple ...


2

But in PKCS#7 people just use the padding size rather than some random bits. Doesn't it make AES deterministic? The padding used for block ciphers is just used to make sure that the plaintext can be split up into message blocks. A few block cipher modes such as ECB and CBC require this due to the way they work. Note that CipherText Stealing (CTS) can be ...


2

This question is based on a false premise, namely, that the difficulty of breaking cryptography (involving a given key type) depends only on the size of the key. This is not how cryptography is broken. The weak point in cryptography is usually flaws in the implementation. For example, one way RSA can go wrong is if the key was not generated correctly. Cases ...


1

Both a hash (like SHA-1) and a cipher (like RSA) are designed to not be reversible. That is, given their outputs (the digest or ciphertext) it should not be feasible to figure out what the input was. The value of a salt is not in making it harder to figure out what the password was from the hashed password. Passwords are often easy to guess. A salt makes it ...


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