9 votes
Accepted

Did digital signatures come from Zero Knowledge Proofs?

Did digital signatures actually come from Zero Knowledge Proofs? You are correct; the original proposals for digital signatures were not based on zero knowledge proofs. The idea of digital signatures ...
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  • 132k
8 votes
Accepted

Difference signature / asymmetric encryption (PQC)

The question's statement The signature algorithms are based on public-key encryption algorithms goes straight against accepted wisdom. Which is that signature and public-key encryption are separate ...
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  • 124k
4 votes

textbook RSA signature scheme security

There is no encryption or decryption here, since this scheme doesn't aim provide any confidentiality. This scheme aims to provide authenticity. The operations are signature (with the private key) and ...
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3 votes

Difference signature / asymmetric encryption (PQC)

Like fgrieu said, not all public-key algorithms are based on bijective trapdoor permutations. If the standardization effort looked for a general-purpose bijective permutation, then we may very ...
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2 votes

Is RSA-signing zero knowledge?

Firstly, we do not not know that any of the signature schemes is proof of holding the RSA secret key $d$. They would be proof of possession of an RSA decryption oracle/method corresponding to the ...
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  • 10.5k
2 votes
Accepted

ASN.1 integer question for DSA

The question has the following things correct: $(p,q,g)$ = (0x8df2…0291, 0xc773…915f, ...
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  • 124k
2 votes

Can one prove that a particular public key is part of an aggregated (MuSig) public key?

The MuSig (and MuSig2) key aggregation function, for the purpose of this question, is a hash function from multisets of public keys to public keys. Proving that a particular key is a member of an ...
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2 votes
Accepted

RSASSA-PSS in TLS 1.2

If the client announces in the Signature Algorithm Extension that it supports one of the RSA-PSS: ...
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  • 136
2 votes

RSA small public exponent signature forgery - use part of the public key as cyphertext

It does appear to be a variation, or possibly an extension, on the BB'06 attack. As you know, with the BB'06 attack, we find a signature $s$ such that $s^3 \equiv m \pmod{2^\lambda}$, where $m$ is the ...
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  • 132k
2 votes

Size of signature

The size of digital signature (that is the size of the cryptogram output by the signature generation procedure) is in practice independent of the message signed and it's size, because what's signed is ...
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  • 124k
2 votes

Size of signature

There are 2 types of signature schemes: Signature with Message Recovery - which is becoming increasingly rare, and Signature with Appendix. The "Appendix" part of Signatures with Appendix ...
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  • 6,621
1 vote

Are Encryption, Key Exchanges and Digital Signature the application of asymmetric encryption

It's quite a bit more complicated than that. There are many different applications and some applications can be implemented with either symmetric or asymmetric primitives. See Handbook of Applied ...
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