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It depends on the hash function you use. If you use fast hashes like MD5, SHA1-, SHA-3, it is not secure, because they make brute forcing easier. There is a set of hash functions (called also key stretching or password derivation functions) like PBKDF2, scrypt, Argon2 that require relatively much computation resources (much CPU, much memory) for every hash. ...


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The main problem will be the password policy and users. If you let the users to choose any password, then they will tend to use 1234 as a password. A malicious user in your system can easily bruteforce all widely used insecure passwords. If you have a good policy, the only way is brute-forcing since we cannot reverse the hash and the salt prevents rainbow ...


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Yes, there is BIP39(Bitcoin Improvement Proposal )in the Bitcoin protocol. That converts a hex private key in to a list of 12 to 24 human readable words. For example you have a cryptographic key E9873D79C6D87DC0FB6A5778633389F4453213303DA61F20BD67FC233AA33262 Gets converted to: witch collapse practice feed shame open despair creek road again ice least ...


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Apparently this answer will be updated as OP develop an understanding of his application. I've never used PGP, but general public-key cryptography concepts are always applicable. entering a private key on a website whenever you need to do something is troublesome You can let clients derive their keys through memorable string - the user agent first ...


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Since I posted this question I learned the answer is to calculate the checksum as already described in the single-character checksum method, but take both letters which comprise the coordinates of the last letter you land on. Actually you should trace over the entire plaintext twice, otherwise if the length of the text were fraudently modified by exactly 1 ...


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